lawyer

Being Real

01/05/2001
Staff Writer

Growing up was never easy for copper-skinned Rebecca Walker, the trophy baby of a new America. Born in 1969, the “Movement Child” of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and activist Alice Walker and civil rights lawyer Mel Leventhal, Walker spent the first two decades of her life failing to fit into a country that still assumes fixed racial categories.

Common Artists, Uncommon Art

01/31/2003
Staff Writer

Its creative ranks include recluses, the insane and former prison inmates, but "Outsider Art" is hardly the exclusive domain of social misfits.

A tour through the American Museum of Folk Art or any number of galleries specializing in what is also known as "self-taught art" exposes viewers to a rich field of artists - including a notable number of Jewish painters - who, while untrained, display a talent for visual expression appreciated by connoisseurs and common folk alike.

Jew(cy) Vs. Jew(cy)

01/10/2003

In this corner: a loose affiliation of young Jewish social activists working to transform Judaism "into a more loving, inclusive and radical culture." In this corner: a team of New York-based theater promoters and PR pros marketing merchandise and events to hip Jews and others aspiring to "kosher-style fabulosity" through a Web site called "Jewcy.com."

The stakes in this battle of attitude: legal rights to the name "Jewcy," a title both contenders claim.

The Restraint Of Otto Preminger

12/26/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

At the height of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Markus Preminger, a brilliant young lawyer, was offered the position of chief prosecutor, an honor never bestowed on a Jewish attorney. There was only one catch: he had to convert to Catholicism. He refused but got the appointment anyway.

Two decades later, his soon-to-be-famous son, Otto Preminger, was offered the post of head of the Vienna State Theater, as prestigious in its field as the chief prosecutor’s job was in his father’s. Same catch: he had to convert to Catholicism.

‘Until The Genocide Stops’

09/22/2006
Special To The Jewish Week

"I’m really, really Jewish, and what’s happening in Darfur hurts me so, so much,” said Jessica Jacobs, a student at the Maimonides Jewish day school in Brookline, Mass., as she stood near the edge of the “Save Darfur” rally Sunday in Central Park.

For This Defense Lawyer, Talmud Is Inspiration

03/19/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

He’s been receiving threats and insults during the last 10 weeks for his defense of Cesar Rodriguez, charged with the abuse and murder of his 7-year-old stepdaughter, Nixzmary Brown. And in the Jewish community, his name has cropped up as the lawyer representing Rabbi Yehuda Kolko, a former teacher at Midwood’s Yeshiva Torah Temimah now facing trial for allegedly molesting three students.

Q Train Case May Hinge On Eyewitness Testimony

12/19/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

The suspects charged in the Q train beating of three Jewish students celebrating Chanukah are guilty of “nothing more than acting as kids,” said Peter Mollo, the lawyer for one of them.

Mollo, whose comments drew harsh reaction from two local leaders, compared how authorities react to such behavior today and how they regarded it four decades ago, when he was a child growing up in Bay Ridge.

A Rabbi Bridges East Side, Hamptons

12/26/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Rabbi Jan Uhrbach is at morning and evening services every day at the East 55th Street Conservative Synagogue. That she’s the first and only woman rabbi to lead a Manhattan shul with a daily minyan is one of her many distinctive steps in a distinguished and unusual rabbinic path.

The 44-year-old rabbi, who was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary in 2003, joined the 150-member, 101-year-old synagogue this fall, after their leader of 40 years, Rabbi Reuven Siegel, retired.

Israeli Economic Engine Now Seen Humming Along

Economy on strong footing as recovery gains steam.

02/03/2010
Staff Writer

Tel Aviv — A year ago if you were a star lawyer looking for a position with an Israeli firm, chances are it would have been a waste of time. As the U.S. economy swayed in financial crisis, companies stopped hiring.

But over the last few months that’s changed.

Bank of Israel Governor Stanley Fischer, left, and Doninique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the IMF
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