judge

Judge Strikes Down State's Kosher Laws

08/04/2000
Staff Writer
Declaring that New York State's kosher laws excessively entangle government with religion, a Brooklyn federal judge has struck down the 118-year-old statutes as unconstitutional. Orthodox kosher law advocates immediately said they would appeal the July 28 decision by U.S. Eastern District Court Judge Nina Gershon, who ruled in favor of a Commack, L.I., butcher whose 1996 lawsuit claimed that the state's kosher laws violated church-state separation.

Hillary Eyeing Move On Pollard

09/22/2000
Staff Writer
Hillary Clinton is holding top-level discussions to determine whether to call for the declassification of a damning secret memo that led to spy Jonathan Pollard’s life sentence, The Jewish Week has learned. It was also learned that Democratic vice presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman recently asked President Clinton to consider declassifying secret documents about the Pollard case, days before being chosen as Al Gore’s running mate.

Berenson Case Garners Attention

03/19/1999
Staff Writer
The first time Rabbi Ronnie Greenwald visited Lori Berenson in her bare and frigid prison cell on a Peruvian mountaintop, he brought her a dozen New York bagels. In his latest visit to the 29-year-old New York woman, serving a life sentence for treason for terrorist acts, Rabbi Greenwald brought her a book on Jewish thought. He believes that shows progress, both in Berenson’s attitude, and her circumstances. The details of Rabbi Greenwald’s trip emerge as Berenson’s case has gained support and publicity.

Vatican To U.S.: No Archives

12/11/1998
Staff Writer
In a defiant statement, the Vatican has rejected U.S. government appeals to open its secret World War II archives, The Jewish Week has learned. The development is expected to heighten tensions between the Holy See and world Jewish community leaders, experts said. “It’s disgraceful,” declared Elan Steinberg, executive director of the World Jewish Congress of the Vatican’s position, contained in a bold three-page declaration selectively distributed at a Holocaust conference in Washington last week.

Shul Keeps Its Spirit

11/01/2002
Staff Writer
Stanton Street Synagogue lives. A small band of worshipers last week secured the right to keep their Lower East Side shul months after their elderly rabbi tried to secretly sell the building to a Jesuit priest. “I think it’s a victory for the Jewish people,” declared congregant Iris Blutreich, who helped lead the bitter two-year battle to save the 90-year-old synagogue. “If we don’t have synagogues, how can we have peoplehood?”

Questions In Lanner Trial

10/18/2002
Staff Writer
Lawyers for Rabbi Baruch Lanner have given official notice they intend to appeal his conviction for sexually abusing two teenage girls while he was their principal at a New Jersey yeshiva. The notice of appeal, filed by New York defense attorney Nathan Dershowitz, comes on the heels of Rabbi Lanner being freed on bail last Friday by a two-judge New Jersey appeals court panel. The rabbi had spent four days in jail to begin serving a seven-year sentence.

Lanner Out On Bail Pending Appeal

10/11/2002
Staff Writer
A New Jersey appellate court Thursday granted Rabbi Baruch Lanner’s emergency request to be free on bail pending the appeal of his conviction of sexually abusing two teenaged girls while he was their principal in a New Jersey yeshiva high school.

Lanner Gets 7-Year Prison Term

10/11/2002
Staff Writer
Declaring that he is “not a monster” and acknowledging errors in judgment — but stopping short of apologizing to the girls he sexually abused — Rabbi Baruch Lanner was sentenced last week to seven years in a New Jersey state prison. Rabbi Lanner, 52, once one of America’s most prominent Modern Orthodox youth leaders, was taken away in handcuffs Friday from the Monmouth County courtroom in Freehold, N.J., after delivering an emotional plea for mercy that invoked the Holocaust, God and his grandchild.

Wanted: True Believers Only

11/18/2005
Editor-At-Large
Anne Lown, a Jewish woman from Boston, had worked nearly 25 years for the Salvation Army's children's services arm in New York when she was thrust into the world of faith-based initiatives. Lown, associate director of the local Salvation Army's government-funded Social Services for Children, was one of 18 employees to leave or be dismissed in 2003-04 for allegedly refusing to sign forms swearing loyalty to the group's Christian principles.
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