historian

Tim Boxer: Lipstadt Still Relishes Victory Over Holocaust Denier

04/11/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

It's been ten years but historian Deborah Lipstadt still relishes her victory in the libel suit brought by Holocaust denier David Irving in London.

Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University in Atlanta, recalled her harrowing court experience at a Yom Hashoa commemoration Saturday at Young Israel of Hillcrest in Queens. President Kevin Leifer said more than 400 people packed the sanctuary for the event, which was sponsored by New York State Assemblyman Rory Lancman.

Deborah Lipstadt and New York State Assemblyman Rory Lancman. Photo: Tim Boxer

Remembering The Forgotten

New Holocaust documentary
highlights the experiences of those
in lesser-known transports.

03/23/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Lukas Pribyl was looking for his grandfather. He knew the old man had been deported from Czechoslovakia in October 1939. He knew his grandfather had been taken to a camp whose name was all but forgotten, not one of the infamous extermination camps of Poland or the concentration camps for political prisoners like Dachau or Mauthausen. Just a small way station in the hell that was Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, a siding to oblivion where his grandfather died.
 

Young Polish Jews in happier times: An image from Lukas Pribyl’s “Forgotten Transports: To Poland.”

When Personal Politics Distorts Jewish History

03/23/2010
Staff Writer

When the Israeli historian Shlomo Sand released his book “The Invention of the Jewish People” in America a few months ago, journalists here wondered if it would attract the same attention it did abroad. It was a bestseller in Israel upon its initial release in 2008, and later won the French journalists’ highest honor, the Aujourd’hui Award. So far, however, the book has made little impact here.

Score One For The Anglos

02/08/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Last month, local media outlets reported that HOT, the country’s sole cable television company, had decided to discontinue broadcasting the BBC-Prime channel, a British station featuring favorite BBC programming. The same month, the YES Satellite channel revealed it would be cutting Star World, another of the very few English-language channels broadcast in Israel.

Survivors: Museum Compromise

03/01/2002
Staff Writer

The Jewish Museum blinked. But it wasn’t enough to placate critics of its controversial exhibition, “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art,” set to open in nine days.

Tea Party Revolution Could Undermine GOP Jewish Outreach

Minorities of all kinds could be targets of angry,
growing movement, some warn.

02/18/2010
Washington Correspondent

An angry “Tea Party” movement that Republican leaders hope to harness to boost their party’s chances in the 2010 congressional midterm elections could also be a potential blow to GOP outreach to minorities — including Jewish voters.

But Republican leaders, too, are in the movement’s cross hairs, and some Jewish leaders worry that the movement could transcend traditional politics entirely and create an extremist surge that is threatening to all minorities.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin spoke recently at the first Tea Party convention. Getty Images

The Miracle Of History

04/28/2006
Special To The Jewish Week

Shortly before Passover, my 4-year-old son sat on my lap as the matzah balls boiled, asking to read through the kids' Haggadah in preparation to recite (or more likely mumble) the Four Questions. The supernatural events that enthralled him (the parting of the Red Sea, the profusion of frogs on Pharaoh's nose and toes) quickly receded for me as I considered the more prosaic miracle of a generation of uninterrupted Passovers, and an exquisite moment of parent-child bonding.

Blood Libels, Then And Now

09/27/2002
Special To The Jewish Week

Publishers Weekly, in its review of the fascinating new book “The Butcher’s Tale: Murder and Anti-Semitism in a German Town” (Norton), notes somewhat offhandedly that “although classed by the publisher as history/Judaica, this powerful volume will also appeal to true-crime readers…”

Shooting The Resistance

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Aleksander Ford was a Jewish-Polish filmmaker whose career summed up the bloody 20th century. He enjoyed one of the rare happy endings, thanks to a mixture of luck and foresight, but it is clear from his best film, “Border Street” (1949), that he knew all too well how rare his good fortune was. “Border Street,” which will have a rare U.S. showing on Nov. 18, was the first fiction feature to attempt to portray the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, and Ford undoubtedly knew many of the men and women who had perished in the flames that engulfed the ghetto.

The Way They Lived

11/20/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

One of the most striking exhibits in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., is the three towers of photographs taken in Eishyshok, documenting that shtetl’s Jewish life before it was destroyed by the Nazis. Viewers are encircled by 1,600 photographs collected by Dr. Yaffa Eliach, a professor at Brooklyn College who was born in Eishyshok. Now, Eliach has published a book that links together the moments captured in the photographs, presenting a full and textured description of the once vital community: It is a work about one town, with clues to many pasts.

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