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Gauging The Fallout From British Expulsion

Action against Israeli diplomat could pave way for possible arrests of IDF officers in England.

03/24/2010
Staff Writer

Britain’s expulsion of an Israeli diplomat over the use of a dozen forged British passports in the killing of a Hamas terrorist in January means Israeli army officers could be arrested if they visit Britain, according to a specialist on the United Kingdom and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Old memories come out of storage each year.The Pesach Dishes

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Like the children of Israel leaving Egypt, the dishes emerge from the darkness of the Rubbermaid bins at the back of my garage, launching a reunion with long-gone relatives who come rushing across the parted sea into my patient, waiting arms. Slowly, I unfurl the newspaper wrapping and announce Pesach’s arrival in my home.
 

A Time For Touching

03/18/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 6:48 p.m.
Torah reading: Leviticus 1:1-5:26
Haftarah: Isaiah 43:21-24:23
Sabbath ends: 7:48 p.m.

 

 

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Reform's Intermarriage Statement: Historic or Ho-Hum?

My initial reaction last week upon reading the press release/announcement from the Central Conference of American Rabbis’ Task Force on the Challenges of Intermarriage for the Reform Rabbi, was, “It took three years of study of deliberation to come up with THIS?”

Portrait Of A Nazi Serial Killer

‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ is an example
of the mystery genre fulfilling the Jewish injunction to remember.

03/18/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

At its heart the mystery genre is about how people deal with past actions. Go all the way back to “Oedipus Rex” and you’ve got a man investigating a crime that happened decades before, and its consequences in the present. It’s a perfect setup for a people whose religion explicitly and repeatedly tells them to remember the past.
 

Niels Arden Oplev’s new “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” has no Jewish characters but a Jewish theme.

The Curse That Rocked Great Neck

A haredi rabbi’s actions — telling Persians at a private
house party that ‘tragedy for eternity’ would befall them — have sent shockwaves through the community.

03/10/2010
Jewish Week Staff Writer

Like biblical plagues raining down on them from an angry God, the white-bearded, black-hatted rabbi laid a string of curses upon the unsuspecting suburban partygoers.

Rabbi Mordechai Aderet: Party crasher frightens guests.

Young Ethiopians Fighting Back

12/19/2007
Israel Correspondent

Petach Tikvah, Israel — Recounting how officials in this central-Israel city stonewalled complaints this month about the segregation of four Ethiopian schoolgirls, Daniel Uoria paused to answer his cell phone. It was an adviser to the deputy mayor.

"It’s because the minister of education is coming here to see what happened," explained Uoria, 29, after the call as he sat in an office at the headquarters of the Kadima Party. "Once you make a stink, suddenly everybody wants to help."

Undermining The Jerusalem Excavations

02/19/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — On Sunday morning Prime Minister Ehud Olmert said it was on. Sometime overnight into Monday, Jerusalem Mayor Uri Lupolianski put it on hold. Tuesday, the Antiquities Authority said it was off. And then, the Housing Ministry insisted it was back on.  

The construction of a bridge from the Western Wall Plaza to the Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem and the start of a companion archeological dig left the government in a state of confusion as tensions smoldered in the contested Old City.

A Jarring Jubilee

05/08/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The schism between religious and secular Israelis has never been wider, the rate of unemployment is soaring and the peace process is nearly on life support.

So what prompted Ziva Moshe, a 44-year-old mother of four, to celebrate Israel’s 50th anniversary with unabashed pride and a traditional barbecue?

“It’s a holiday, a beautiful sunny day and I’m happy,” said Moshe, who like hundreds of thousands of other Israelis congregated in the nation’s parks on Israeli Independence Day.

Mission Of The Young

05/07/1999
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — For the first time in her life, Efrat, a 19-year-old yeshiva student, will be voting in Israel’s national elections. Seated around a table with girlfriends in the food court of a downtown shopping mall, the soft-spoken teenager lists the issues most important to her.

“There needs to be more unity among all the people. Right now, there’s a distance between us. We need to be one nation, one people,” she says.

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