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Crushes Gone By

When I was in high school, I took a private course to prepare for the S.A.T.'s because that's what all my friends were doing. And, if you think about it, what does it say about university entrance exams if they require extra preparation that only some families can afford?

But lest you think this is a high and mighty commentary about class and education, don't you worry your pretty little head: It's all about my love life.

Don't Take Your iPad to Israel

If you just bought the new iPad from Apple and your thinking about what a luxury it will be on your eleven-plus hour flight to Israel... think again!

A New Medium For Holocaust Stories

Part graphic novel, part documentary, ‘motion comics’
help attract viewers to difficult topics.

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The creators of “They Spoke Out: American Voices Against the Holocaust,” a new series of motion comics, can each talk about why that relatively new medium is best suited for telling the stories they chose — those of Americans who helped rescue Jews in the 1930s and ‘40s.

But perhaps no explanation is more compelling than the one offered by Neal Adams, a legend in the comic-book industry and the illustrator of the new series.

New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia’s forceful stance against Nazi Germany is told in “LaGuardia’s War Against Hitler.”

No Netanyahu at Nuke Summit

A few weeks ago, I was wondering what was going through Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's head when he decided to attend next week's nuclear summit in Washington, where representatives of 47 countries, including many of heads of state, will gather to talk about nuclear terror, and in the process produce what local officials say will be some record-breaking traffic gridlock.

Facebook in Israel

Something unusual happened last month. For the week ending March 13, 2010, Google wasn't the most visited website in the U.S. That week, Facebook reached the coveted #1 ranking. The market share of visits to Facebook.com increased 185% that week as compared to the same week in 2009, while visits to Google.com increased 9% during the same time frame. Together Facebook.com and Google.com accounted for 14% of all U.S. Internet visits during that week.

Unkosher Wheels, Friendly Faces

Williamsburg bike shop playfully flouts
the antipathy of some area residents to cyclists.

04/07/2010
Staff Writer

Jammed between industrial brick buildings on the cusp of chasidic South Williamsburg and hipster North is a white canopy that reads the words “Traif Bike” – in bold block letters that sandwich the silk-screened head of a chasid clad in side curls. Traif is Yiddish for non-kosher.

Beneath the canopy, passersby can visit a large black vending machine labeled “Bike Shop,” whose rotating carousel features $55 U-locks, $5 handlebar grips and $2 tire patch kits, among other life necessities like a $33 used BlackBerry.

Baruch Herzfeld, the self-proclaimed “new rebbe of Williamsburg.

Our Tweeter in Washington

Much has already been made of the social media posting habits of William Daroff. Whether on Twitter or Facebook, the well-connected director of the Washington Office of The Jewish Federations of North America (and its VP for Public Policy) isn't afraid to go public with his whereabouts, upcoming speaking engagements, or even his drinking buddies.

William Daroff
PHOTO BY ADAM KREDO

Beyond The Rabba-Rousing

Lost in the furor over Sara Hurwitz’s title is the broader issue of women’s roles within Modern Orthodoxy.

03/24/2010
Staff Writer

 Dina Najman, rosh kehila (head of the congregation) at Kehilat Orach Eliezer on the Upper West Side, spends a majority of her day answering halachic questions, teaching classes expounding upon Jewish texts and counseling couples and individuals who are having personal difficulties. Her male rabbinic colleagues often consult with her on questions of bioethics, her area of expertise.

The bulk of the work that she does, she says, is not gender specific — and shouldn’t be viewed that way.

Rabba Sara Hurwitz: Fallout seen masking deeper concerns. jta

Clinton’s Bluntness At AIPAC Rattles Nerves; Linkage Rapped

Scramble to decipher new diplomatic language; Gen. Petraeus’ comments seen as ‘dangerous.’

03/24/2010

With nerves frayed after the worst U.S. - Israel diplomatic dust-up in years, Jewish leaders this week were trying to assess whether there has been a fundamental change in U.S. policy toward Jerusalem — or simply a change in tone by an ally frustrated by the long years of stalemate.


Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tells AIPAC crowd that status quo in Israeli-Palestinian conflict is untenable. getty images
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