Governor

Sympathy For The Devil?

Old murder case solved; Orthodox Jewish reaction unresolved.

03/02/2010
Associate Editor

Long after a murder leaves the front page, it lingers in a kitchen grown quiet, or when dialing a phone forever unanswered, when private jokes stay private, and you say “all right” when people ask, but your seders aren’t the same, and Christmas isn’t Christmas, for mourners all share the same pew in pre-dawn sleeplessness.

Jonathan Mark

New State Funding For Sex Abuse Awareness

Gov. Paterson reportedly approves $500,000 to fight problem; abuse advocates raise questions.

03/05/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

In the days before Gov. David Paterson’s already-embattled administration began to implode in an alleged cover-up scandal involving a top aide, Paterson reportedly agreed to allocate $500,000 to help identify and treat sex abuse victims in the Orthodox Jewish community, The Jewish Week has learned.

Assemblyman Dov Hikind: “Major campaign” to fight child sexual abuse.

New State Funding For Sex Abuse Awareness

Gov. Paterson reportedly approves $500,000 to fight problem; abuse advocates raise questions.

03/02/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

In the days before Gov. David Paterson’s already-embattled administration began to implode in an alleged cover-up scandal involving a top aide, Paterson reportedly agreed to allocate $500,000 to help identify and treat sex abuse victims in the Orthodox Jewish community, The Jewish Week has learned.

Assemblyman Dov Hikind: “Major campaign” to fight child sexual abuse.

On South Beach Florida's Jewish Past Is Present

12/16/2008
Managing Editor

The elderly Jews are gone now, the ones who carried their  Yiddish cadences and stories of the rag trade and the Old Country with them down to the tip of Miami Beach. Throughout the ’50s and ’60s and ’70s and even into the ‘80s, they sat in rickety, rainbow-striped folding chairs on the warm sand, sweet Atlantic breezes tousling their white hair. Or they sat on the front porches of the many small Art Deco-style hotels and apartment buildings they called home in their autumn years, whiling away the hours in their Southern shtetl.

Vallone Braves Hebron

04/24/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — While British Prime Minister Tony Blair practically did cartwheels to avoid courting controversy during his visit to Israel this week, New York City Council Speaker Peter Vallone, also on a whirlwind tour, took no such precautions.

The Art Of Budget Cuts

03/05/2003

In what one arts advocate called the "ritual mating dance" that starts off months of fiscal back-and-forth, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has recommended slashing 6.2 percent from the Department of Cultural Affairs, a decrease that arts advocates calculate will translate into much larger cuts for some institutions and groups. Gov. George Pataki recently proposed slashing 15 percent from the New York State Council on the Arts, while New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey has proposed a temporary freeze on all grants to arts groups.

Jersey Poet Laureate Unrepentant

09/27/2002
Staff Writer

Newark, N.J. — Controversial New Jersey poet laureate Amiri Baraka, whose recent poem “Somebody Blew Up America” suggested that Israel knew in advance about the Sept. 11 terror attacks, blasted his Jewish critics Wednesday, calling the Anti-Defamation League “the voice of imperialism.”

Baraka is refusing to resign his post despite calls from New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey that he step down, adding Wednesday, “I will not apologize.”

N.J. Eyes Bill To Oust Baraka

10/11/2002
Staff Writer

New Jersey poet laureate Amiri Baraka says he will fight legislation aimed at removing him from the state-appointed position, telling The Jewish Week Tuesday he was prepared to take legal action if a bill being drafted this week in the state Senate passes. “I certainly will sue,” he said Tuesday by phone from his home in Newark.

Legal experts say the controversial poet could have a good case on free-speech grounds.

Tea Party Revolution Could Undermine GOP Jewish Outreach

Minorities of all kinds could be targets of angry,
growing movement, some warn.

02/18/2010
Washington Correspondent

An angry “Tea Party” movement that Republican leaders hope to harness to boost their party’s chances in the 2010 congressional midterm elections could also be a potential blow to GOP outreach to minorities — including Jewish voters.

But Republican leaders, too, are in the movement’s cross hairs, and some Jewish leaders worry that the movement could transcend traditional politics entirely and create an extremist surge that is threatening to all minorities.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin spoke recently at the first Tea Party convention. Getty Images
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