General

Liberalism Still Rules

11/18/2005
Staff Writer
If American Jews are tacking to the right, nobody told them. That is the finding of a national public opinion study released last week. According to the National Survey on Race Relations and Changing Ethnic Demographics in the United States of America, commissioned by the New York-based Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, Jews in this country align themselves more with African-Americans on attitudes toward race and poverty, and with Hispanic-Americans on attitudes about immigration, than do other whites.

Israeli Team’s Efforts Stand Out In Haiti

As IDF rescuers and doctors save lives,
rare praise for a disproportionate response.

01/21/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Israel’s rapid response to the disaster in Haiti and the success of its experienced emergency team in saving many lives has drawn extensive media coverage, and has become a major source of pride in the Jewish community.

The Israel Defense Forces sent 220 personnel to the Caribbean island on Jan. 15, three days after a 7.0-scale earthquake devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and surrounding areas. The team included 40 doctors, 20 nurses and paramedics, search-and-rescue teams with trained dogs and other specialists.

Rescue workers on Jan. 15 carry an injured survivor of the earthquake in Haiti to the Israeli field hospital, where some 40 doct

The State Of The Union

Orthodox marriages are happier than others, but are nonetheless plagued with stressors, study reports.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

Orthodox marriages may be happier than their secular counterparts. But religious unions are rocky enough to concern a team of researchers and rabbis who presented the results of their recent study on marital satisfaction at the Orthodox Union here last week.
“Traditional family values and religious values tend to overlap,” said Eliezer Schnall, an assistant professor of psychology at Yeshiva University, who was responsible for analyzing the data. “But there are also those in this community who are not as happy with their marriages.”

Israel Lost; Jews Won

Monday, February 23rd, 2009   Few things illuminate just how useless Israel can sometimes be better than its film industry. This year, “Waltzing With Bashir” was Israel’s entry for Academy Award’s Oscar for best foreign language film.   It lost. Good.   The film focused on the killings at Sabra & Shatilla during the first Lebanon war. That’s when, in Menachem Begin’s words, “goyim kill goyim, and they come to blame the Jews.”  

Israel Didn’t Leave, It Lost - Like Blanche DuBois

Wednesday, January 21st, 2009 The first rule of pride is this: When they run you out of town, walk like you’re leading the parade.   I’ll give Israel this: When international pressure got to be too much, Israel left Gaza as if it was Israel’s bright idea, “a unilateral ceasefire.”  

Potiphar’s Wife & The Spiritual

Friday, July 11th, 2008 History is written by the winners, and so is the Torah. Korach is depicted as a bad guy, when an honest reading of the last three-and-a-half books of the Torah suggest that Moses was a singularly uninspiring leader, a less poetic speaker than most any prophet that followed, and just begging for a challenge from Korach or anyone else. Whatever Korach’s failings, the tragedy of the Korach story is that a more suitable challenger to Moses was surely intimidated into silence by the heavy-handed obliteration of Korach.

Tutoring Teens On Israel

09/27/2002
Special To The Jewish Week
Over the past two years, the Jewish community has slowly begun to address that Jewish university students largely lack the knowledge to argue Israel’s case on campus.   Now the community is preparing an even younger group: day school students.

Back In The Big Apple

09/19/2003
Staff Writer
A week before opening in two productions at Symphony Space (as Allen Ginsberg's mother in "Kaddish L'Naomi" and in the autobiographical one-woman play "Summer of Aviyah") one of Israel's leading ladies was giving a solo performance of a different kind.    

Dark Star

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
Next week, television viewers will have a chance to spend a few revealing hours with Adolph Hitler. "Hitler: The Rise of Evil," the two-part miniseries that airs May 18 and 20 on CBS, covers biographical territory well-known to fans of the History Channel, the cable network awash in Hitler-centric documentaries. But for audiences with limited knowledge of Hitler's prewar career, the lushly filmed four-hour drama will illuminate how the infamous hate-monger came to wield unlimited power over a modern democratic nation.
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