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Green Day For AJC

11/17/2009
Staff Writer

San Francisco — In its effort to elevate the issue of energy independence, the venerable American Jewish Committee has pushed for policy change in Washington, “greened” its own New York headquarters and even offered cash incentives for its employees to buy hybrid cars.

A Tesla electric sports car parked outside of San Francisco’s JCC, site of an environmental conference. Right, AJC “green” missi

The Meat Of Jewish Continuity

12/22/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

Two new books focusing on meat, Jonathan Safran Foer’s “Eating Animals” and David Sax’s “Save the Deli,” offer fascinating and contrasting views on the value of meat in American Jewish culture. Although the books are, so to speak, apples and oranges — “Eating Animals” is a moral indictment of factory farming and “Save the Deli” is a rhapsody for a disappearing culinary institution — they suggest the diverse, divergent ways in which American Jewish life is defined by its attitudes about food.

Lancaster's Jews Open Their Hearts To Amish

10/13/2006
Special To The Jewish Week

For Lisa Wright, one of the few Jews of Lancaster County to live in a rural area with Amish neighbors, what stands out about the past two weeks are mostly the contrasts.

Stories For A Depression

Sunday, October 12th, 2008 If this a depression, let’s take a trip to a rooming house porch, 1938.   Indians pitcher Bob Feller recently spoke to Terry Pluto, the Cleveland Plain Dealer sportswriter (and religion writer) about the time, in 1938, when the future Hall of Famer lived modestly, in a rooming house.   He was 19, son of an Iowa farmer.  

Out Of Bounds On Eruv

11/01/2002
Staff Writer
Sometime late next month a freighter from Israel will dock at Dar es Salaam, the capital of Tanzania on the African coast of the Indian Ocean, and a shipment of large, perforated plastic pipes will be unloaded. David Robinson, a former New Yorker and current resident of Tanzania, will be at the Dar es Salaam port to make sure the pipes clear customs. And he will be in Dara, a mountainous area in western Tanzania near the Zambian border, when the pipes arrive by truck a few days later.

Grounds For Success

11/01/2002
Staff Writer
Sometime late next month a freighter from Israel will dock at Dar es Salaam, the capital of Tanzania on the African coast of the Indian Ocean, and a shipment of large, perforated plastic pipes will be unloaded. David Robinson, a former New Yorker and current resident of Tanzania, will be at the Dar es Salaam port to make sure the pipes clear customs. And he will be in Dara, a mountainous area in western Tanzania near the Zambian border, when the pipes arrive by truck a few days later.

A Day Of ‘Conscious Kills’

On the eve of Thanksgiving, a local shochet provides a sharp contrast to the big slaughterhouses.

11/25/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

Walton, N.Y. — Andy Kastner rarely eats meat and wishes others would eat less, too.

So why, you might ask, was this man slaughtering kosher turkeys this week for Thanksgiving?
Kastner is a shochet, the fellow ordained to kill livestock according to Jewish law. But he also considers himself an educator. It’s his job, he explained, to remind the public about the cost of meat beyond the sticker price: in blood and emotion.

“It’s a profound experience that is generally written off as disgusting or brutal,” he said.

Compassionate cut: Shochet Andy Kastner with the tool of his trade. Ron Dicker

Telling Two Stories With One Voice

10/16/2009
Staff WriterS
Bill Tingling, founder of a Brooklyn-based literacy project that teaches public school students the fundamentals of journalism, was looking for a new way to discuss prejudice a few years ago. Have the students — mostly from the minority community — interview Holocaust survivors, suggested an Irish friend of Tingling.

Greenberg Acres

02/25/2005
Staff Writer
Benyamin Cantz spent his recent days pruning a mountainside vineyard in central California, in the middle of a redwood forest overlooking the Pacific Ocean. At the same time, Rabbi Shmuel Simenowitz was opening trails in southern Vermont, chain saw in hand, in a maple forest near the Massachusetts border.
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