executive vice president

Confronting Problems

03/24/2005 - 19:00
Staff Writer

Underage drinking, drug abuse, eating disorders, low self esteem and other parental concerns and realities were confronted Sunday when more than 700 New York-area parents spanning Orthodoxy’s ideological gamut convened at Edward R. Murrow High School in Brooklyn for the Orthodox Union’s Positive Jewish Parenting Conference.Parents hungry for child-rearing advice with a hechsher attended psychologist- and social worker-led workshops such as “Is My Teen Just Being a Teen? Or Help! Do I Need Somebody?”

This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’ offers game-filled Jewish education with a soft sell for 4- to 10-year-olds.
03/04/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.
A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

A Jewish Club Penguin? Created by an Israeli for-profit.

This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’ offers game-filled Jewish education with a soft sell for 4- to 10-year-olds.
03/01/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.

 

A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

 

A Jewish Club Penguin?  JLand is considerably more sophisticated and ambitious than other Jewish computer games.

90 Years Of Shaping New York Jewry

05/17/2007 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part series connected to the 90th anniversary of UJA-Federation of New York. The differences between the American Jewish community of the early 1900s and today’s American Jewry are vast and notable. Volumes have been written about the ethnic division that marked the earlier community, between the well-established, often wealthy German Jews, who began arriving in the 1840s and ‘50s, and the more than two million new arrivals from the shtetls of Eastern Europe, many of them mired in poverty and “Old World” ways.

Claims Conf. Fraud Put At $350,000; No Survivor Funds Bilked

Three fired here after phony claims uncovered; feds probing ‘sophisticated’ scheme.
02/10/2010 - 19:00
Staff Writer

The Claims Conference fired three employees last week who allegedly approved more than 100 fraudulent Holocaust-era claims — filed primarily by Russians now living in Brooklyn — that bilked the German government out of more than $350,000, The Jewish Week has learned.

A federal investigation has reportedly been launched but it is not known if the employees, one of whom was the supervisor of the Hardship Fund, were complicit in the fraud. The Claims Conference declined to reveal their names.

A Match Made In ... Queens

Novel fundraising approach enables Orthodox day school to thrive.
02/10/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

Alan Steinberg likes to call it the “miracle on Grand Central Parkway.”
Last summer, Yeshiva Har Torah, where Steinberg serves as executive vice president, was, like many other Jewish day schools, scrambling to raise funds to compensate for its widening, $400,000 budget gap.

Lucky for them, a donor approached, offering to match all funds raised in the school’s “Mind the Gap” campaign. But there was a catch: every Har Torah family would have to make some sort of contribution, and within 30 days.

Yeshiva Har Torah’s parents rallied together to donate $200,000 to the school, matched by an anonymous donor.

Fresh Debate Over New National Charter School Movement

Steinhardt-backed group looks to seed 20 new schools, while other charter supporters call vision 'misguided.'
02/02/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

The race to establish a national Hebrew charter schools movement has officially begun, igniting a growing, and fierce, debate about the vision and purpose of schools that could potentially revolutionize the American Jewish education landscape.

Principal Maureen Campbell with students at Brooklyn's Hebrew Language Academy Charter School

Opening Hearts, Wallets For Haitians

Jewish community here, in outpouring of care, pitches in after quake.
01/20/2010 - 19:00
Staff Writer

At a Jewish Y on Long Island, Jewish employees take up a collection for the families in Haiti of two maintenance men. In Brooklyn, members of the haredi Orthodox community hold a historic meeting with representatives of the borough’s Haitian-Americans. In southern Florida, a former New Yorker travels to Haiti on short notice to help the relatives of his Haitian-born employees.

The work of Israeli doctors in a makeshift army field hospital in Haiti. Getty Images

New Test For Jewish Schools

02/06/2003 - 19:00
Staff Writer
With the city Board of Education undergoing its largest changes in more than 30 years and major state budget cuts anticipated, Rabbi Leib Kelman is hoping the girls at his 1,200-student Prospect Park Yeshiva don't lose out on the special needs services, textbooks, remedial support and other aid funneled to the school through the local district. New York's vast school bureaucracy, which for three-plus decades was administered largely from 32 decentralized districts, is in the midst of a major restructuring, with the mayor and chancellor gaining power.

Birthright And Beyond

04/04/2002 - 19:00
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Jackie Garonzik came back from her birthright israel trip two years ago feeling “a strong pull toward Judaism.” In the first few months back at Johns Hopkins University, the pre-med student explored Jewish groups on campus and “would go to Shabbat dinner for a little bit.”  
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