Economist

Searching For A Gillibrand Rival

GOP gains may give state party a shot at its first Senate victory since 1992, if the right candidate emerges.

03/18/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

 

 
Un-elected Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand may not face a serious Democrat primary this year, but if state Republicans have their way she’ll face more than a token challenger in November.
 
State GOP leaders have been courting contenders to take on the junior senator, but heavy hitters such as former Mayor Rudolph Giuilani and publisher Morton Zuckerman have taken a pass.
 

Dan Senor.

Sometimes, Less Is More

12/08/2006
Special To The Jewish Week

The pride Boris Juray takes in his small tailoring shop in South Brooklyn is evident in how he discusses the business, how other members of his family have gotten involved and how a small-business loan from a Jewish program helped his store survive.

‘Phantom Rule’ May Have Limited Holocaust-Era Awards To Claimants

06/29/2007
Staff Writer
When a commission investigating Holocaust-era life insurance policies ended its work in March after nine years, it boasted that it had awarded more than $300 million to survivors and their heirs. Now, a former commission arbitrator is criticizing the group’s work, alleging that a “phantom rule” was used by some of the dozens of arbitrators, accounting in part for the denial of 84 percent of all claims filed. The arbitrator, Albert B. Lewis, who is also a former New York State insurance superintendent, is calling for a reopening of these cases.

Job Losses Mount for Well-Off in Community

11/18/2009
Staff Writer

Bob S., a 50-year-old computer specialist from Scarsdale, was laid off from his $175,000-a-year job in March after years of steady employment. He, his wife and their two children began living off the family’s savings, canceled their vacation plans and began eating all their meals at home.

Job seekers line up in Midtown outside a job fair. Middle- and upper-middle-class Jewish men appear to be among the hardest hit

Stocking Up On Israel

01/28/2000
Staff Writer
When Clifford Goldstein was 7, his father took him to the Waldorf Astoria Hotel for a stockholders meeting of the Israeli company Ampal. "I had five shares, so I went with him and I liked the feel of it," he recalled. "People were there as investors, but my father was there more because he wanted to invest in Israel."
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