drummer

A Riff On Coexistence

05/06/2005
Managing Editor

Arnie Lawrence, a veteran alto saxophonist and influential jazz educator who moved to Israel in 1997 to found a jazz center teaching Jewish and Arab musicians, died April 22 in Jerusalem from lung and liver cancer. He was 66. This article first appeared in The Jewish Week in January 2001, when Lawrence was in New York to be honored by The New School's jazz program, which he helped found.

Downtown: A Tale Of Redemption

01/02/2008
Managing Editor

In a high-lonesome twang right out of the piney woods of the Ozarks, rock and roll Americanist Levon Helm sings of “a sorrow in the wind / blowin’ down the road I’ve been / I can hear it cry while shadows steal the sun.” Helm was the soulful, Arkansas-raised drummer in the pioneering ‘60s roots rock group The Band, and the song is an old gospel tune “Wide River to Cross” on his new CD, “Dirt Farmer.” It’s a prayer, really, a poignant hymn to loss but also a declaration that life rambles on, that “I’m only halfway home,

A Riff On Coexistence

05/06/2005
Managing Editor

Arnie Lawrence, a veteran alto saxophonist and influential jazz educator who moved to Israel in 1997 to found a jazz center teaching Jewish and Arab musicians, died April 22 in Jerusalem from lung and liver cancer. He was 66. This article first appeared in The Jewish Week in January 2001, when Lawrence was in New York to be honored by The New School's jazz program, which he helped found.

Downtown: A Tale Of Redemption

01/02/2008
Managing Editor

In a high-lonesome twang right out of the piney woods of the Ozarks, rock and roll Americanist Levon Helm sings of “a sorrow in the wind / blowin’ down the road I’ve been / I can hear it cry while shadows steal the sun.” Helm was the soulful, Arkansas-raised drummer in the pioneering ‘60s roots rock group The Band, and the song is an old gospel tune “Wide River to Cross” on his new CD, “Dirt Farmer.” It’s a prayer, really, a poignant hymn to loss but also a declaration that life rambles on, that “I’m only halfway home,

Klez-Jazz Uptown

08/08/2003
Special To The Jewish Week

Long before hip-hop turned sampling into an art form, before “postmodernism” became a label slapped on anyone whose music borrowed eclectically from other cultures and traditions, Jewish music was evolving through a process of accretion, taking scales from this neighbor, rhythms from that one, harmonies from yet another, making a virtue of the necessities of the diaspora.

That process has continued to this moment as contemporary Jewish musicians unblushingly put the hyphens in klez-jazz.

Sisters In Swing

12/21/1999
Special To The Jewish Week

There were a thousand women, and they were on their feet, swaying to a klezmer beat. The place was the Michigan Womyn’s Festival, the most successful of the many all-women’s music events that are held all summer across the United States. Isle of Klezbos was playing on the “night stage,” the primo venue at the festival, “the culmination of the whole event,” says Eve Sicular, the band’s leader and drummer. “ People told me later about how this was unlike any experience they had there.

The Chance To Fight Back

04/09/2004
Staff Writer
Military service is in the Perl family’s blood. Pvt. Otto Perl spent nearly a year in the Austrian army from 1937 to 1938. His father had been an officer in that same army in World War I, and two of his uncles had served in WWI. Perl, a tailor, was 22 in early 1938 when he was discharged a few months before his homeland was annexed by Nazi Germany. A Jew, he was arrested and sent to the Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps for a year. He survived the forced labor and beatings and frigid weather.
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