Chancellor

New JTS Focus on Pastoral Care

Staff Writer
09/22/2009
In meeting with Conservative rabbis from across the country who were ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, its chancellor, Arnold Eisen, found the “overwhelming majority” had been inadequately trained in pastoral care. At the same time, Eisen said, the rabbis said it was the “most rewarding part of their jobs — dealing with people at times of stress, end of life and serious illness.” “Rabbinical students who got this training said it was the most meaningful part of their education,” he said.

'Wartime' For Hitler

04/11/2003
Staff Writer
Just as they had won over some of their harshest critics, the people behind an upcoming miniseries about Adolph Hitler find themselves on the defensive again. This week's TV Guide quotes Ed Gernon, who was executive producer of "Hitler: The Rise of Evil," as characterizing the German leader's ascent to power as a cautionary tale for Americans today.

Activists Renew Fight For Gay Ordination

04/09/1999
Staff Writer
The struggle over gay rights in the Jewish community heated up this week in the Conservative and Orthodox movements. At the Jewish Theological Seminary on the Upper West Side, a group of rabbinical students are launching an effort to gain grassroots support to change the Conservative ban on ordaining gay and lesbian rabbis. The action follows a heated meeting between the students and Chancellor Dr. Ismar Schorsch, who reiterated his long-standing opposition to overturning the ban against openly gay rabbinical students.

A Pilgrim's Progress With New York's Jews

05/12/2000
Staff Writer
Last January, dozens of well-heeled New Yorkers gathered at Manhattan's Waldorf-Astoria to raise money for the archbishop of New York's last gesture toward the Jewish community he held so dear. The archbishop's birthday dinner raised $1.5 million for the establishment of the John Cardinal O'Connor Distinguished Chair in Hebrew and Sacred Scripture at St. Joseph's Seminary, the Westchester institution that trains future priests. O'Connor wanted to teach seminarians greater respect for the Jewish roots of Christianity.

Seminary Heads Unite Against Missionizing

11/12/1999
Staff Writer
In an unprecedented public display of unity, the leaders of America's four major Jewish seminaries signed a letter of protest to the head of the Southern Baptist Convention decrying its new support of "deceptive" tactics to convert Jews.

Schorsch: Focus On Past Hurting Interfaith Ties

04/30/1999
Staff Writer
Baltimore — The Jewish community must stop fixating on Holocaust-related issues if dialogue with the Catholic Church is to progress, Dr. Ismar Schorsch, chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary declared Wednesday during a panel featuring Cardinal William Keeler, Baltimore’s internationally known Jewish expert.

Spiritual Struggle

04/30/1999
Staff Writer
Baltimore — What do an expert on Buddhism, a Christian theologian and a former Reagan administration bureaucrat have to say about Jewish spirituality to a room full of Conservative rabbis? That was the question here this week when all three addressed several hundred rabbis and guests at the 99th annual convention of the Rabbinical Assembly, the organization representing the world’s 1,500 Conservative rabbis.

The Case For Teshuvah

09/18/1998
Staff Writer
Like the biblical prophets Samuel and Nathan, who admonished their kings for sinning, the spiritual head of the Conservative movement found himself a lone Jewish voice in the nation this week following his daring call for President Clinton to resign. Ismar Schorsch, chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, last week thus became the first national Jewish religious figure to urge Clinton to quit because of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. He said the president’s moral authority has been “destroyed” and in effect cannot be recovered.

Pitch For Pluralism

05/14/1999
Staff Writer
For the first time, the Jewish Theological Seminary, which likes to be known as the spiritual center of Conservative Judaism, is involving itself ever so cautiously in next week’s Israeli elections. Just in time for the May17 vote, the seminary is advertising in two Israeli newspapers to gently remind Israeli voters not to forget the religious pluralism issue, which threatens to divide voters. “VOTE WITH YOUR HEART — AND YOUR HEAD,” urges the ad slated for the May 14 edition of Haaretz and Maariv.
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