Chairman

Howard Berman, Peace Now and right-wing pot shotters

So let’s see: J Street is “anti-Israel,” according to the many emails I continue to receive and blogs I read (if Google News Alerts are any measure, J Street must be the single most active topic in the entire known universe).   And Americans for Peace Now (APN) is, by almost any objective standard, further to the left than the upstart J Street.

Darkness After ‘Noon’

As a new biography shows, the second half of Arthur Koestler’s life, marked by a peculiar mix of Zionism and Jewish self-hatred, was one of steadily declining reputation.

01/22/2010
Staff Writer

If you were Jewish and lived in the 1940s, to say that Arthur Koestler was on your side was no small thing. Then at the height of his renown, Koestler, born in Budapest in 1905, had become one of Western literature’s most revered figures. His anti-Stalinist novel “Darkness at Noon,” published in 1940 and still his most famous, made him one of the first liberals to come out against Communism. The book would partly inspire George Orwell, an author whose reputation today far eclipses Koestler’s.

The new biography of Arthur Koestler by Michael Scammell, bottom, revives an overlooked thesis.

The God Wars, Revisited

Q and A with Natan Aviezer, professor of physics and a former chairman of Bar-Ilan University in Israel.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

Natan Aviezer is a professor of physics and a former chairman of Bar-Ilan University in Israel. The author of “In the Beginning: Biblical Creation and Science” and “Fossils and Faith: Understanding Torah and Science,” he writes about Torah and science, and contends that the first chapter of the Bible is not a mythological tale but rather is in exact agreement with recent findings in cosmology, astronomy, geology and biology. He was recently in New York on a U.S. speaking tour.

Professor Natan Aviezer: Sees Bible both literally and figuratively.

American Jewry’s Decade Of Decadence

While too many Jewish communities historically had to struggle amid the curse of anti-Semitism, American Jewry is flummoxed by its blessings.

12/30/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

It is tragic yet emblematic that Bernie Madoff, the billion-dollar Ponzi schemer, is this last decade’s most influential American Jew. In fairness, if this great economic recession recedes, thanks to Time’s 2009 Person of the Year, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, historians will remember Bernanke more than Madoff. But it is premature to assess Bernanke’s success, while the damage Madoff caused was clear.

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Ramaz Tower Plan Shelved For Now

02/20/2008
Staff Writer
The Ramaz Lower School, on East 85th Street, will not be relocating in  September, and plans for the 28-story mixed-use high-rise have been temporarily halted, school officials confirmed in a letter distributed to the parent body last week.   

‘Angels’ For Israeli Start-ups

02/06/2008
Staff Writer
When Warren Buffett plunked down $4 billion for an 80 percent stake in Israeli-based Iscar Metalworking in 2006, his first-ever foreign acquisition sent an unmistakable message that Israel’s industry is a good bet for foreign investors. Today, though Israel’s economy suffers from a growing income gap between rich and poor, foreign investment is up and Israeli high-tech start-ups are on the rise.  

Maimonides Meets Microsoft

11/22/2002
Staff Writer
Think of My Jewish Learning — the Jewish Internet-based venture from mega-donors Lynn Schusterman and Edgar Bronfman launched this week — as “Encyclopedia Judaica” on Broadband or Maimonides Meets Microsoft.   

House Of Seven Siddurs

04/14/2000
Staff Writer
The rabbi’s tour of the sanctuary at Woodlands Community Temple stresses what isn’t there. “No fixed bima,” Rabbi Billy Dreskin says, pointing to the ark on wheels in the eastern corner of the room, flanked by ceiling-high windows—plain panes, no stained-glass — that open to a woodsy street in Greenburgh.“No fixed seating.” Instead, there are several rows of folding chairs, which are rearranged for different services and synagogue events. And, in the pewless space, no sign of prayer books.  

No Longer The ‘Nazis’

08/06/1999
Staff Writer
Eleven days in Germany provided an education for teachers who teach about the Holocaust. The group of 28 educators from Westchester and Rockland counties visited schools and memorials recently to observe how the genocide of World War II is taught in the land where it began.It was a trip marked by changes.Some of the teachers said their view of Germany — and of contemporary Germans — was changed by meetings with teachers and students.
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