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Studying Hate

Indiana U. launches contemporary anti-Semitism center, the second major academic institution of its kind. Will politics compromise its mission?

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

In recent years, Jewish intellectuals have sometimes bemoaned the anti-Zionist views heard on college campuses, and among liberal intellectuals generally, but have failed to do much about it. But that may be changing.

Last month, the chair of the Jewish studies department at Indiana University in Bloomington, Alvin Rosenfeld, announced the foundation of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism. His goal is to study, in a dispassionate, scholarly way, what he thinks is just a new version of a very old kind of hate: anti-Semitism.

Professor Alvin Rosenfeld, who teaches Jewish studies at Indiana University.

Obama hit from both sides on faith-based initiative

The natives are getting restless when it comes to the Obama administration's Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships .

Today the Anti-Defamation League joined with 23 other national organizations  in a statement urging the administration to make sure federal funds distributed as part of the ongoing faith based initiative aren't used to proselytize or discriminate based on religious beliefs.

A Charge Of Double Betrayal In Williamsburg

09/05/2008
Special to The Jewish Week

Joel Engelman was 8 years old the first time he was summoned to the principal’s office at his Satmar school in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Not knowing what he might have done to provoke the call, Joel was nervous, as his principal, Rabbi Avrohom Reichman, had a reputation for being strict.

A Charge Of Double Betrayal In Williamsburg

09/05/2008
Special to The Jewish Week

Joel Engelman was 8 years old the first time he was summoned to the principal’s office at his Satmar school in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Not knowing what he might have done to provoke the call, Joel was nervous, as his principal, Rabbi Avrohom Reichman, had a reputation for being strict.

Howard Berman, Peace Now and right-wing pot shotters

So let’s see: J Street is “anti-Israel,” according to the many emails I continue to receive and blogs I read (if Google News Alerts are any measure, J Street must be the single most active topic in the entire known universe).   And Americans for Peace Now (APN) is, by almost any objective standard, further to the left than the upstart J Street.

The ‘Evil Son’ Has Evolved

01/22/2010

This week’s portion contains the very bedrock of Judaism: the charge to tell the story of the Exodus to every “next generation.”

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‘To Build A Palace...’

Special To The Jewish Week
12/08/2009
On Saturdays, I often wake up in a grumpy mood. I know it is Shabbat, a day for synagogue and siestas, for refraining from the frenzy of the workaday world, for building what Abraham Joshua Heschel famously called “a palace in time.” But in my apartment, the only castles under construction are the kind we tend to trip over, those erected from blocks by my 5-year-old son and my 7-year-old daughter. In my home, Saturday has long been simply the day before Sunday. And that makes me grouchy.

Putting A Mitzvah On Ice

 Monday, January 4th, 2010

Note: I rather cavalierly stated below that the people who go swimming in the ocean during the winter do not seem to do so when there are no cameras around. I stand corrected. For the record, at least one of these groups meets every Sunday during the winter.

 

Anyone who watches or reads the news in New York has to be aware of the Polar Bears, that wacky group of folks who annually celebrate the new year by jumping into the icy Atlantic from Coney Island beach.

 

Cracking The Glass Ceiling

05/28/2008
Editorial Intern
In today’s America, a woman can battle her way through a presidential campaign, but she will still find it difficult to reach the top of most Jewish organizations. Women may dominate the Jewish communal workplace in numbers but, stifled by a glass ceiling, they rarely become leaders, according to Shifra Bronznick, co-author of a just-published guidebook called “Leveling the Playing Field” (Advancing Women Professionals and the Jewish Community and Cambridge Leadership Associates).

The Overlooked Day Of Freedom

04/23/2008
Staff Writer
Call it the overlooked Day of Freedom. In a week marked by Passover festivities, American Jews may have easily disregarded “Tax Freedom Day,” which fell out yesterday, April 23. No it’s not a newfangled holiday you’ve never heard of. And it won’t grant you a day off. Rather, it’s the day when taxpayers finish working for the government and begin working for themselves — at least theoretically.  
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