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Educators Balk At Grants’ Loss

11/05/2004
Staff Writer

Yeshiva and day school administrators who gathered at the Board of Jewish Education on the eve of Yom Kippur voiced their displeasure with a change in funding that will end basic grants to their institutions and instead provide health care coverage and life insurance to additional teachers.

The mood was tense and the discussion spirited as representatives from more than 50 New York-area Jewish schools, spanning the ideological gamut, spoke out against a recent decision by the Fund for Jewish Education to cut about $2.2 million in school grants.

Levin gets Ways and Means, Stark dissed

This just in: Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich) will replace Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) as chair of the powerful House House Ways and Means Committee, according to a New York Times news flash.

A Museum Grows In Queens

03/01/2002
Staff Writer

A visit to Bukharian New York, an area that stretches along Queens Boulevard from Rego Park through Forest Hills to Kew Gardens, is not complete without the consumption of regional delicacies, insists Aron Aronov. But for this community activist, who has a Bukharian Jewish museum stashed in his cellar, a pit stop at the Uzbekistan Tandoori Bread shop on 83rd Avenue quickly becomes an opportunity for kibitzing more than noshing.

Nazi Artist, Muted Opening

02/15/2002
Staff Writer

A month after controversy engulfed The Jewish Museum’s upcoming exhibition of Nazi imagery in contemporary art, the real thing is now on display in a Chelsea gallery.

Scheduling Leni Riefenstahl’s first New York solo show of photographs from “Olympia,” her film about the 1936 Berlin Games, to coincide with the Salt Lake Olympic Games, gallery owners Marianne Boesky and Marla Hamburg Kennedy are now scrambling to soften the impact of their exhibition of Hitler’s favorite filmmaker.

Into The Mystic

05/02/2003
Staff Writer

The models and movie stars filing past the phalanx of flashbulbs at the New Museum last week had not come to see the latest exhibition of contemporary art or next fall's fashions. They had been invited to the book launch party for "The 72 Names of God: Technology for the Soul," the latest publication from the Kabbalah Centre International.

Mr. Bellow’s Planet

04/29/2005
Special To The Jewish Week

At the Koret Jewish Book Awards last week in San Francisco, Stanford Professor and Koret Awards chair Steven Zipperstein asked for a minute of silence to remember Saul Bellow, who had just died. Zipperstein rightly praised Bellow for his unique contribution to Jewish and American letters, and we must give Bellow his due for helping create a new American language mixing high and low, combining the immigrant’s energy with the scholar’s subtlety.

Swimming Toward Truth

01/21/2005
Special To The Jewish Week

Yonatan Zilberman may have been a bit hesitant when he began thinking about directing his first film, the documentary “Watermarks.” After all, his academic background at MIT was in physics and business. He was executive producing another documentary when he first learned of the amazing story of the Hakoah Vienna sports club and its assemblage of world-class Jewish athletes, but he wasn’t — strictly speaking — a filmmaker.

His friend and soon-to-be-co-producer, Yonatan Israel, however, never had any doubts.

A Lesson In Location

01/16/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Joseph Cedar’s learning curve has been impressive. The New York-born Israeli filmmaker has made only three feature films to date, and each has been the Israeli representative to the Academy Awards. From his intelligent but uneven first feature, “Time of Favor,” through his sophomore effort, “Campfire,” to his new film, “Beaufort,” is a series of quantum leaps in assurance, control of tone, creative use of screen space and sheer cinematic intelligence.

Shooting The Resistance

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Aleksander Ford was a Jewish-Polish filmmaker whose career summed up the bloody 20th century. He enjoyed one of the rare happy endings, thanks to a mixture of luck and foresight, but it is clear from his best film, “Border Street” (1949), that he knew all too well how rare his good fortune was. “Border Street,” which will have a rare U.S. showing on Nov. 18, was the first fiction feature to attempt to portray the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, and Ford undoubtedly knew many of the men and women who had perished in the flames that engulfed the ghetto.

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