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UJA-Fed. Leaders: Connect To Care Will Continue

Jerry Levin, Alisa Doctoroff to take top lay spots in July; recession initiative supported.

03/24/2010
Staff Writer

The incoming top two lay leaders of UJA-Federation will start their tenure during an ongoing recession and high unemployment. But a major program that was created to help the Jewish community deal with the downturn in the economy will continue, says incoming president Jerry Levin.
 
Connect to Care, which was launched by the philanthropy last year with a one-year budget of $6.8 million from UJA-Federation reserves, will receive funding beyond this month, says Levin, who will become president on July 1.
 

Jerry Levin and Alisa Doctoroff, from disparate Jewish backgrounds, will join to lead UJA-Federation for the next three years.

Service-Learning Project Brings Hillel Students Here

Program includes work in Harlem and the Jewish community, but raises questions for some.

03/23/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Thousands of Jewish students in recent years have spent their winter, spring and summer breaks building homes in New Orleans, working with the rural poor in Guatemala and helping staff human rights groups in Asia and Africa. It’s all part of an upswing in community service opportunities offered by organizations like Hillel, the American Jewish World Service, Jewish federations and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee.

Hillel students assemble Passover packages in Queens.  TOP PHOTO: Doug Chandler

Tim Boxer: Providing For New York's Hungry

03/21/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

New York Sate Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is amazed how Pomegranate, the ultramodern kosher supermarket in Brooklyn, has inspired so many kosher shoppers.

"My wife gets her Shabbos food there every Friday," he told me.

Having made an impact on shoppers - with its valet parking, and aisles wide enough to navigate with a golf cart, never mind shopping cart - it's no wonder that the store's owner was one of four honorees recognized by Met Council.

Met Council CEO William Rapfogel honors Pomegranate owner Abraham Banda and American Express chairman/CEO Kenneth Chenault

The Pushke App

Getzy Fellig’s eCharityBox makes tzedakah
easier for both donor and recipient.

03/11/2010
Staff Writer

The pushke, or charity box, may well be a relic of the past to many members of the younger generation of Jews. In fact, promotional materials for eCharityBox paint the small tin can as a PC in a world of Macs — not only old school, but also a barrier to giving for those who want to give on the go, with just a click of their BlackBerry or iPhone.

Getzy Fellig

New Israel Fund

03/11/2010

 New Israel Fund (NIF) CEO Daniel Sokatch opines that his group has been the victim of “false arguments and dangerous demonization” (‘The Real Anti-NIF Agenda,’ Feb. 16). But Sokatch cannot allege falsehood and demonization if I merely point out that several of the beneficiaries of the New Israel Fund (NIF) are in fact hostile to Israel’s existence as a Jewish state.

Homebuyer Heartache In The Holy Land

08/17/2007
Israel Correspondent

Modi’in Illit, the West Bank — For anyone thinking of purchasing an Israeli apartment scheduled to be built in a year or two — many of whom are likely to be Americans, given the foreign investment boom — let the buyer beware.

So says Chaim, a clean-cut 24-year-old fervently Orthodox father of one, with another on the way, who purchased an apartment from the building company Heftsiba in this fervently Orthodox settlement just over the Green Line.

Federation Fete

10/26/2007

Too often we take our Jewish communal successes for granted and focus on our problems. One of the ongoing success stories is the work and reach of UJA-Federation of New York, the world’s largest local philanthropy, with its more than 100 constituent agencies providing social services for Jews and others in need here in New York as well as in Israel, the Former Soviet Union and communities around the world.

90 Years Of Shaping New York Jewry

05/18/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part series connected to the 90th anniversary of UJA-Federation of New York. The differences between the American Jewish community of the early 1900s and today’s American Jewry are vast and notable. Volumes have been written about the ethnic division that marked the earlier community, between the well-established, often wealthy German Jews, who began arriving in the 1840s and ‘50s, and the more than two million new arrivals from the shtetls of Eastern Europe, many of them mired in poverty and “Old World” ways.

Adapting As Needs Change

05/25/1997
Special To The Jewish Week

Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part series connected to the 90th anniversary of UJA-Federation of New York. The first part, concerning the federation’s history, appeared last week.

The help that Irina Dubrovskaya receives from the Hebrew Free Loan Society, one of the 24 charter agencies that launched what is now UJA-Federation, is similar to much of the aid the federation funded through the society in its early years.

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