artist

Theologians Cry Foul Over Ward Remarks

04/27/2001
Staff Writer
The “Charlie Ward controversy” is exposing a vein of Christian Evangelical thought that may be far more widespread — and far more harmful to Jews — than previously believed, say religion experts. The remarks by the veteran Knicks guard made during a Bible study session with teammates — that the Jews are Christ killers and that they persecute Christians to this day — point to two troubling developments in Jewish-Christian relations, those experts say.

Is SUPERMAN ‘Judenrein?’

06/26/1998
Staff Writer
In his latest adventure, Superman travels back in time to face the horrors of the Holocaust firsthand. But nowhere in this special comic-book story is the word Jew mentioned. In fact, editors at DC Comics, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Co., deleted “Jewish” from the story entirely, says Superman writer-artist Jon Bogdanove. “They didn’t want me to use the word Jewish,” Bogdanove says. “They wanted to avoid using buzz words.”

Covering Jewish Art: Tobi Kahn At MOBIA

Sunday, November 15th, 2009 The Jewish Week is proud of our arts coverage, but let’s take a look at what else is out there.

Debbie Friedman Concert For Reform’s HUC

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009 (Here’s a press release for the great Debbie Friedman and an honorable cause. — JM) “DEBBIE & FRIENDS:” CONCERT TO BENEFIT HUC-JIR AND ITS SCHOOL OF SACRED MUSIC - Launching of National Cantorial Scholarship Initiative

... And Butterflies, Too

04/14/2009
Staff Writer
The library of Houston’s Holocaust Museum looks like a butterfly refuge. An artist’s vision of a butterfly refuge, that is. Hanging from the ceiling, nailed to the walls, sitting on the floor are butterflies fashioned from paper, papier-mache, stained glass and other media. The art works are among the early submissions in a long-term Butterfly Project initiated by the 13-year-old institution.

Fifteen Minutes Of Fame In Slovakia

07/30/2008
Staff Writer
The most famous person with roots in the northeast corner of Slovakia is Andy Warhol, the late pop artist and avant-garde filmmaker whose parents came from the village of Mikova. The most famous Jews in the area are Franz Kafka, Golda Meir, Albert Einstein. They are among the 10 Jews in an exhibition of Warhol silkscreen prints, fittingly named “Portraits of Ten Jews,” at the Warhol Family Museum of Modern Art in Medzilaborce, a few miles from Mikova in the Subcarpathian foothills.

Fighting Back With Satire

03/17/2006
Staff Writer
In the pages of The New Yorker, a cartoon shows an Orthodox Jew with a protruding nose walking away from his just-spanked son. The child is holding a drawing of a sack of money. "So let that be a lesson to you, Abie," the father warns. "It is forbidden to depict the profit!" The cartoon is the work of Art Spiegelman, who is Jewish. Online, a call goes out for the best anti-Semitic cartoons in the world. The contest is sponsored by a Tel Aviv comic books publishing firm. Only Jews can enter. All the firm's owners are Jewish.

The War, At Makor

08/11/2006
Staff Writer
A green hatchet, some red Cedars of Lebanon, some poetry, some cartoons, some photographs, some blog journals printed out on pink sheets of paper. In the weeks since the war in Lebanon began, a wide variety of artistic and non-artistic types have expressed their feelings about the fighting — and the 92nd Street Y’s Makor Gallery on the Upper West Side has put many of their expressions in 8-by-10-inch wooden frames and hung them in a public display.

Zayds Goes To Germany

03/16/2007
Staff Writer
Visitors to a new Jewish museum, which opens Thursday in the heart of Munich, will be able to learn on four exhibition floors about Jewish life and culture in Germany’s Bavaria region. And at the entrance to the building they will learn a bit about a Jewish family from Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Ten original cartoons from “Everything’s Relative,” a decade-old comic strip that appears in this newspaper and a handful of other Jewish papers in the U.S., will be posted as silk screens on the walls at the front door.

A Lesson In Eclectic Judaism

10/22/2004
Staff Writer
Vanessa Hidary, a performance artist best known for her work with Russell Simmons’ hip-hop Def Poetry Jam, tells the story of the man she met at a bar who remarked that she “doesn’t look Jewish.” Hidary, aka the “Hebrew Mamita,” a fixture on New York’s on-the-edge cultural scene, shared her thoughts on the man’s shallow remarks during her performances before avant guard audiences.
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