Uri

Writing In A Time Of Darkness

12/23/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

In David Grossman’s title essay from his new book “Writing in the Dark,” the Israeli novelist states that writing “has immense power, the power to change a world and create a world, the power to give words to the mute and to bring about tikkun — “repair” — in the deepest, kabbalistic sense of the word.”

A simple sentence, bold in its assertion of the power of writers and writing, but one that reveals layer upon layer of meaning.

First of all, what is “the Dark” to which he refers?

In Search Of A Miracle

03/25/1999
Staff Writer
Vered Ben-Shimon speaks slowly, rolled up on a couch. She is frail and constantly short of breath. Once an Israeli dance teacher who worked out four times a week, she now sleeps 14 hours a day. She cannot lift or take care of her 19-month-old son."I can't do anything physical. I can't drive," says Vered, 34. The Huntington resident, who moved from Israel with her husband, Uri, in 1987, has been diagnosed with viral cardiomyopathy, or congestive heart failure. "I need a new heart. I could die any day," she says.
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