Tovah Feldshuh

April 11, 1944 and April 11, 2010

Sixty-five years after the Holocaust, and Yom Hashoah -- April 11 -- remains, appropriately, a day that the Jewish community can't figure out how to observe. And rightly so. Most holy days are actually on the day something unique happened, unlike Yom Hashoah, whose Nissan 27 date was a Knesset compromise rather than a holy anniversary.

Yiddish’s New Frequency

03/01/2002
Staff Writer

Only the gentlest prodding gets Dave Isay and Henry Sapoznik to sputter superlatives about “The Yiddish Radio Project,” the serendipitous act of cultural reclamation they co-produced, which airs on National Public Radio starting this Tuesday.

“It’s like opening King Tut’s tomb,” says Sapoznik. “It’s like the Rosetta Stone,” says Isay.

Will The Circle Be Unbroken?

11/01/2002
Staff Writer

The Workmen’s Circle/Arbeiter Ring started more than a century ago in a tenement on the Lower East Side. It developed over the decades from a mutual-aid society for immigrants into an activist organization bristling with radical ideologies and aimed at promoting secular Jewish education. Next week, the group marks the start of its second century with a celebration of Yiddish culture at Town Hall.

Galvanized By Their Love Of Israel

05/11/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Far from letting recent events in Israel dampen his mood or keep him away from this year’s Salute to Israel Parade, Marc Fein, a senior at Yeshiva University, suggested that now was an especially important time to show his love and support for the Jewish state.

Standing in front of the General Motors Building at Fifth Avenue and 59th Street, near the start of the parade route, Fein said that, if anything, he believed that concerns over Israeli security “galvanized support to a certain degree. People have realized the existential threat to Israel.”

Serious Summer Fare

08/17/2007
Jewish Week Book Critic

Even books with footnotes can make for great summer reading.

For those who prefer their late summer fare more substantial than breezy novels and suspense fiction, many new works of nonfiction offer compelling reading. Some are inspirational, looking toward the month of Elul with its contemplative mood beginning the process of teshuvah; some break down stereotypes and perhaps prompt readers to rethink long-held assumptions.

SPRING ARTS-THEATER LIST

02/13/2009
 “Irena’s Vow.” Tovah Feldshuh moves to Broadway in this play about a Polish Catholic housekeeper who hid Jews in the basement of the Nazi’s officer’s villa in which she worked. Previews March 10th and opens March 29 at the Walter Kerr Theatre. For tickets, $41-$98, call Telecharge at (212) 239-6200.

Tovah's 'Aliyah' To Broadway

10/03/2003
Staff Writer
After playing Jewish mothers in the recent films "Kissing Jessica Stein" and "A Walk on the Moon," Tovah Feldshuh might have feared being typecast when offered a role as another older Jewish woman.  

Will The Circle Be Unbroken?

11/01/2002
Staff Writer
The Workmen’s Circle/Arbeiter Ring started more than a century ago in a tenement on the Lower East Side. It developed over the decades from a mutual-aid society for immigrants into an activist organization bristling with radical ideologies and aimed at promoting secular Jewish education. Next week, the group marks the start of its second century with a celebration of Yiddish culture at Town Hall.

Yiddish’s New Frequency

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Only the gentlest prodding gets Dave Isay and Henry Sapoznik to sputter superlatives about “The Yiddish Radio Project,” the serendipitous act of cultural reclamation they co-produced, which airs on National Public Radio starting this Tuesday. “It’s like opening King Tut’s tomb,” says Sapoznik. “It’s like the Rosetta Stone,” says Isay.
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