Theodor Herzl

Clash Of Zionisms In Academia

Group of scholars pressing idea of cultural Zionism, amid pushback.

06/23/2010
Staff Writer

 From the United Nations to the capitals of Europe to the pages of the New York Review of Books, Zionism — and the Israeli policies that undergird it — have lately come under withering attack.

Israel is reeling from the international condemnation following the failed flotilla attack. And Peter Beinart’s essay in the NYRB — which attacked Jewish leaders for failing to inspire a new generation of Jews committed to Israel — urged a more liberal Zionism as a way to get young Jews back in the fold.

Noam Pianko’s new book  focuses on forgotten cultural Zionists.

Fauxtographing the News: From Herzl to the Flotilla

Cross-posted at Blog.RabbiJason.com

Photoshop might not have been around a century ago, but the altering of images to change history has been around for a very long time.

This is a doctored photo of Theodor Herzl from 1898

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi: A Messenger for Israel

06/02/2010

Israel’s disputes with its neighbors have a long history — but there’s also a less tangible, but no less important front line: the media. Public opinion in the United States is an important area of concern for Israel, especially considering Israel has not always been great with its own public relations. Fortunately, there are a number of American-based groups that help make the case for Israel, and one of the best is The Israel Project (TIP).

Jennifer Mizrahi

Celestial City, Terrestrial City

The dizzyingly complex question of sovereignty over Jerusalem.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/12/2010

 Late last month, as Israelis celebrated the 62nd birthday of the Jewish state and the 150th of its inventor, the great Theodor Herzl, a full-page ad appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. The text was penned by another esteemed Jew, the Nobel laureate, prolific author and Auschwitz survivor Elie Wiesel. Needless to say, his piece drew a lot of attention.     

 Jerusalem

Jewish Cooking, 19th-Century Style

First-ever Jewish cookbook auctioned

03/24/2010
Editorial Intern

 So you think your Passover cleaning is tough.

“Before using the kitchen tables, they must undergo a thorough scrubbing, and be rinsed with scalding water. It was customary in England to lay them in fuller’s earth, which is not so well known here; so it would be advisable to have coarse cloths tacked on instead. The cisterns must be cleaned, and a piece of flannel put on the nozzle of the hydrant.”

Esther Levy’s 1871 cookbook, the first Jewish cookbook in America, fetched $11,000 at auction last week.

Resolved: Israel Is Still A Jewish State (UPDATED)

Is Israel a Jewish state or the state of the Jewish people?

That’s the question that faced voting representatives at this week’s conference of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs. Many voted in favor of amending the language of a 2008 JCPA resolution in support of a two-state Mideast solution to remove the words Jewish state. The motion, which was not carried, was sponsored by the JCRC of St. Louis.

Ghosts And Giants

03/06/2009

Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

Giving Herzl His Due

Israel Correspondent
01/16/2009
Jerusalem — When a group of Birthright Israel students entered the Herzl Museum on Mount Herzl earlier this month, they knew next to nothing about Theodor Herzl, the man who galvanized his fellow Jews to dream about, and work toward, the establishment of a Jewish country. An hour later the students emerged with a greater understanding of how and why Israel was established, and amazed that a totally secular Jew with no prior yearning toward Zion could become the world’s most outspoken advocate for a secure Jewish homeland.

Classic Sites To See - Again

Special To The Jewish Week
10/27/2009
A tourist’s first visit to Israel typically has a predictable itinerary: the Western Wall, Masada, Tel Aviv. Return visitors are often keen to experience different sites, ones they missed the first time. But in the last five years, a wide range of attractions all over Israel have undergone such extensive renovation or expansion that they are worth a repeat visit.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.
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