Steven Spielberg

The View From Inside

03/14/2003
Staff Writer

For those who were spared the horrors of the Holocaust, the events that made up the Nazis' Final Solution persist as a collage of black-and-white images - documentary photographs taken by the Nazis to record their horrific achievements or film footage taken by the Allies as evidence of the tragedy they encountered at liberation. Even Steven Spielberg's cinematic rendering, "Schindler's List," preserved the duotone palette of historical Holocaust memory.

The Tragedies of Bernie Madoff

12/16/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

I’ve been a congregational rabbi now for almost thirty years, and I’ve learned lots of things about lots of things.  I know a lot more about human nature and the human condition than I possibly could have known when I was new to the craft, and of course, I’m still learning.

‘Curating Lives’

Special To The Jewish Week
11/17/2009
Ilana Segal loves stories and the process of uncovering them, which is why she worked as a curator for many years, examining and unearthing the tales behind objects for New York’s Central Synagogue, the library at the Jewish Theological Seminary and North Suburban Synagogue Beth El in Chicago. “I love pulling out the stories of lives, people and places,” she said. “I’m driven by the rich stories that lay hidden in objects, and doing the right research to expand those stories.”

Question Of Conscience, Revisited

09/05/2003
Staff Writer
An Internet search for Istvan Szabo's films on the Reel.com Web database brings up the Hungarian director's Academy Award-winning "Mephisto" and the other installments in his 1980s trilogy about characters compromised by war. Like those films, "Colonel Redl" and "Hanussen," Szabo's newest release, "Taking Sides," returns to the battleground between conscience and collaboration.

The View From Inside

03/14/2003
Staff Writer
For those who were spared the horrors of the Holocaust, the events that made up the Nazis' Final Solution persist as a collage of black-and-white images: documentary photographs taken by the Nazis to record their horrific achievements or film footage taken by the Allies as evidence of the tragedy they encountered at liberation. Even Steven Spielberg's cinematic rendering, "Schindler's List," preserved the duotone palette of historical Holocaust memory.

Opposing Sainthood For Pope Pius

05/21/1999
Staff Writer
Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Academy Award-winning producer of Holocaust-related documentaries, has called for a letter-writing campaign to block sainthood for Pope Pius XII, saying it would desecrate the memory of the Shoah because of his silence during World War II. "Such a nomination demeans the meaning of sainthood for countless others who are truly deserving of such a tribute," he declared during his State of World Jewry address last week at the 92nd Street Y.

Breaking The Munich Silence

03/31/2006
Staff Writer
New Haven, Conn. Dan Alon can give two reasons why for 34 years he never spoke about the 1972 Summer Olympics at Munich, where 11 members of the Israeli delegation were killed by Palestinian terrorists, where he was an athlete on the Israeli team, where he was among five Israelis who escaped by jumping to safety off a balcony in the Olympic Village. First, no one asked. "Nobody was interested in what happened to us, the survivors," he said. "The media was concerned about the people who died, about the terrorists, about the Mossad."

The Chance To Fight Back

04/09/2004
Staff Writer
Military service is in the Perl family’s blood. Pvt. Otto Perl spent nearly a year in the Austrian army from 1937 to 1938. His father had been an officer in that same army in World War I, and two of his uncles had served in WWI. Perl, a tailor, was 22 in early 1938 when he was discharged a few months before his homeland was annexed by Nazi Germany. A Jew, he was arrested and sent to the Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps for a year. He survived the forced labor and beatings and frigid weather.

Schindler's Apprentice

09/15/2009
Staff Writer

More than 60 years ago, little Leon Leyson steadied himself on top of a box each morning, climbing the makeshift step stool to operate the controls of a metalworking lathe machine that towered over his skinny 13-year-old body. 

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