Steve Lipman

A Forest Of Symbols In Tel Aviv

09/21/2007
Staff Writer
Tishrei, the time of tzedakah in Israel, took symbolic form in Tel Aviv this week. During the Ten Days of Repentance, when the crucial role of charity assumes a prominent role in the High Holy Days liturgy, when the yom tov expenses of Jewish households rise dramatically, the Latet organization brought the concept to one of Israel’s central gathering places — through cardboard cutouts.

Closer To God, Far from Shul

09/07/2007
Staff Writer
There are people who don’t want to come to a traditional structure because they don’t like tradition,” Rabbi Hoffman says. Hence his abbreviated, participatory service in a decidedly non-synagogue site. “We cater,” he says, “to both a traditional and non-traditional crowd.”

New WJC Exec: Lauder To Head Restitution Effort

08/31/2007
Staff Writer
Schneider, 68, takes over the day-to-day reins of the World Jewish Congress at a time when, he acknowledges, the organization is searching for new causes to champion, and amid questions about its own ability to function effectively after so much internal conflict. But Schneider sought to portray himself in the interview as being above the fray, coming in with a fresh slate to re-energize the organization.

WJC Hot Seat For JDC Vet?

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
In the late 1970s the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, the New York-based organization that supports Jewish life in small communities around the world, needed someone to head its office in Tehran.

Gentrification Eats Up Kosher Bakery

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
A country steeped in memory, the cup of coffee and a Danish. For the last 20 years, lunchtime for Rabbi T. has meant a two-and-a-half block walk from one Lower East Side institution, Mesivta Tifereth Jerusalem, the yeshiva where he teaches Talmud, to Gertel’s, a kosher bakery where he buys a snack and sits at a small table, reviewing a Hebrew text. (Many members of the haredi community are publicity-shy.) Starting Monday, Rabbi T. will have to get his lunch somewhere else.

War Of The Generations

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
untry steeped in memory, the Jewish state operates on a calendar of Jewish holidays that are implicitly or explicitly memorials, both religious and secular. But the fast pace of recent decades in Israel, one crisis or scandal or existential threat following closely on the heels of another, has left little time for communal remembrance of the latest events.

Mezuzah Standoff In Ft. Lauderdale

02/23/2007
Staff Writer
A mezuzah placed on the door of a condo in South Florida, of all places, is stirring a controversy. Laurie Richter, a recent law school graduate, attached the mezuzah to the doorpost of her condo apartment in Fort Lauderdale when she moved in on Dec. 1, and the condo board told her recently to take it down. The Port condominium told Richter that the mezuzah violates bylaws that prohibit owners and occupants from attaching, hanging, affixing or displaying anything on the building’s walls, doors, balconies, railings and windows.

The Torah In The Window

01/19/2007
Staff Writer
Each year the 12th-grade students of the Solomon Schechter School of Westchester spend a week in Poland, on the way to Israel, learning about Jewish history at the site of death camps, synagogues and forests. This year their most poignant lesson came at an antiques shop on a Warsaw side street. They discovered a Torah scroll there.

Stransky Who?

12/24/2009
Staff Writer

 Steve Lipman’s article, “A Boot Against Apartheid” (Dec. 11), is ludicrous. The focus is on Joel Stransky, of the South African rugby team of 1995, recapturing some of his fame from his portrayal in “Invictus.” 
Nowhere in the film is there a reference to Stransky or that the person who made the winning kick was Stransky, or that Stransky was the only Jew on the team, or that there was a Jewish player on the team.
Shame.
 

Grave Memories

12/22/2006
Staff Writer
It began with a visit to a single grave. About a decade ago, Rabbi Manfred Gans, spiritual leader of Congregation Machane Chodosh in Forest Hills, accompanied a congregant, a recent widower, to the man’s late wife’s grave in Beth David Cemetery in Elmont, L.I. The congregant, Jack Kremski, and his wife, Anna, were Holocaust survivors, natives of Czestachowa, in Poland.
Syndicate content