Side

The Glass Pulpit

08/06/2004
Staff Writer

Female rabbis in the Conservative movement face obstacles to career advancement not unlike those encountered by women in other historically male-dominated professions.

A new report shows that women rabbis earn $77,000 annually on average, while men make about 50 percent more, earning an average of $119,000 per year.
The study also found that women tend to lead smaller and less populous congregations, and hold fewer influential non-pulpit positions than do their male counterparts.

The Mourning Son

10/02/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

"For many years I had lived without religion. But I could not have lived without the possibility of religion,” Leon Wieseltier writes in “Kaddish.”

Conservative Jewry’s Orthodox Rabbi

08/15/2008
Staff Writer
So much for a quiet retirement. About the time last month that Rabbi David Lincoln, senior spiritual leader for 21 years at Park Avenue Synagogue on the Upper East Side, stepped down from the pulpit, he appeared on a Jewish cable television show. Part of an interdenominational panel of Jewish leaders, he offered his comments on the series of scandals that have struck the Orthodox community in recent years.

From Silwan To The Upper East Side

08/07/1998
Staff Writer
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict was the furthest thing from Joseph Fteha’s mind when he sought to sue the family next door to his elderly mother’s house for building their garage over her property line. True, the property was in East Jerusalem, his late Palestinian father’s native city. But what did a boundary dispute there between him and the Arabs next door to his mother’s property have to do with Middle East politics?

Where The Boys Aren't

10/20/2006
Staff Writer
Andrew Roberts, an articulate 16-year-old junior at the Riverdale Country School, enjoys Judaism in an intellectual way, like when he discussed the Torah portion each week while attending the Rodeph Sholom Day School through eighth grade.

The Mikveh Goes Upscale

07/14/2006
Staff Writer
Upgrading mikvehs into sumptuous spa-like environments is the new wave these days, and the recently opened ritual bath on the Upper East Side and one being planned for the Upper West Side in the fall are no exception. On East 77th Street, the local Chabad house opened the doors last Thursday to a new $12 million mikveh, making it the only ritual bath on the Upper East Side. The new mikveh brings to four the number of public mikvehs in Manhattan, joining ones on the Lower East Side, the Upper West Side and Washington Heights.

Conservative Jewry’s Orthodox Rabbi

08/13/2008
Staff Writer
So much for a quiet retirement. About the time last month that Rabbi David Lincoln, senior spiritual leader for 21 years at Park Avenue Synagogue on the Upper East Side, stepped down from the pulpit, he appeared on a Jewish cable television show. Part of an interdenominational panel of Jewish leaders, he offered his comments on the series of scandals that have struck the Orthodox community in recent years.
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