Paul McCartney

All You Need Is ... Hate

The moral contradictions behind the effort to pressure Paul McCartney not to play in Israel.

09/24/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

The theme song for radical Islam is not exactly “Let it Be.”
 

Salman Rushdie spent nearly a decade of his life with a fatwa hanging over his head for having written “The Satanic Verses.” To Muslim clerics the novel presented irreverent depictions of the Prophet Muhammad, which, in the Islamic world, is tantamount to signing your own death warrant.
 

A number of years later, Danish cartoonists suffered a similar fate after newspapers published cartoons that Muslims deemed to be mocking of Mohammad.
 

It Took a While, But…Paul McCartney in Israel

09/12/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

It’s not a slow news time, to be sure, but after a conversation with my sister a few days ago, I know what the really big news story is in Israel.  It’s not about Ehud Olmert, Tzippi Livni, or any other political or religious figure; it’s about Paul McCartney.  Yes, Paul McCartney, whose forthcoming concert in Park HaYarkon on September 25 promises to be the biggest such event in Israel’s history.  

 

A Bat Mitzvah Girl Takes Berlin

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The Jewish world's youngest ambassador to Germany is a frizzy-haired 12-year-old bookworm with a mean crush on Prince William of England. Nelly Sue Edelmeister is the adolescent heroine of a new novel, "Prince William, Maximilian Minsky and Me," by the Brooklyn-born Berliner Holly-Jane Rahlens.

A Bat Mitzvah Girl Takes Berlin

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The Jewish world's youngest ambassador to Germany is a frizzy-haired 12-year-old bookworm with a mean crush on Prince William of England. Nelly Sue Edelmeister is the adolescent heroine of a new novel, "Prince William, Maximilian Minsky and Me," by the Brooklyn-born Berliner Holly-Jane Rahlens.

Sir Paul In Tel Aviv

10/03/2008
Staff Writer
Imagine there’s no controversy. It’s not so easy in Israel, but former Beatle Paul McCartney, on his first visit to the Jewish state last week, tried. Forty-three years after the Beatles were to give a concert in Israel — the concert fell through because of either conservative politicians or dueling promoters — Sir Paul performed in Tel Aviv’s HaYarkon Park, ignoring protests by Palestinian politicians and threats by Islamic clerics.

Sir Paul In Tel Aviv

09/29/2008
Staff Writer
Imagine there’s no controversy. It’s not so easy in Israel, but former Beatle Paul McCartney, on his first visit to the Jewish state last week, tried. Forty-three years after the Beatles were to give a concert in Israel — the concert fell through because of either conservative politicians or dueling promoters — Sir Paul performed in Tel Aviv’s HaYarkon Park, ignoring protests by Palestinian politicians and threats by Islamic clerics.
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