Pat Robertson

Texas Gov. Perry: Gulf oil spill could be 'act of God.'

 Can you believe this guy?

According to Politico, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican, is now arguing that the Gulf of Mexico oil spill may have been an “act of God.”

Church-state follies in Virginia riles Jewish groups

 Christian right groups are applauding and Jewish groups are protesting the recent action by Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, a Republican, rescinding a 2008 order requiring police chaplains in the state to use only nondenominational prayers at official events, not prayers invoking the name of Jesus.

Well, no big surprise here; McConnell is a graduate of Pat Robertson's Regent University, and he's the guy who managed to embarrass many Virginians wityh his recent decision to revive Confederate History Month - later amended after a flurry of bad nationwide publicity.

More on Haiti: the good, the bad and the ugly

It’s no secret that great disasters bring out the best and the worst in people – the selfless rescuers who put their own lives on the line to save people they don’t know on one hand, the looters who use catastrophe as an opportunity for larceny, petty and otherwise, on the other.

So it is with the unimaginable tragedy in Haiti.

The Timeless Bad-Things/Good People Question

Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinberg, leader of the Orthodox Union, is out with an inspiring op-ed carried by JTA about how we as Jews should respond to massive disasters. It’s well worth a read.

Poverty As A Moral Issue

03/13/1998
Staff Writer
Former Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.) believes it is time for religious leaders to unite and take a stand against a growing social ill in America — poverty. The former Democratic presidential candidate with the trademark bow tie notes that it has been more than a generation since religious leaders such as Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the Berrigan Brothers and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel joined together for causes of moral concern.

Birthright NEXT Speaker Touts Messianic Judaism

11/10/2009
Staff Writers

An Evangelical leader who believes Jews can accept Jesus without giving up their Jewish identity will be the keynote speaker next week at an event for Birthright Israel alumni, sponsored by Birthright NEXT and the Jewish Enrichment Center (JEC).

Robertson at Birthright: is there a double standard for the Christian right, left?

Earlier this week  Sharon Udasin And Stewart Ain  reported that Birthright-NEXT, the group focused on reinforcing Jewish and pro-Israel identity among young American Jews, invited  Gordon Robertson – son of the controversial Christian broadcasting magnate Pat Robertson – as keynoter for a Birthright Israel alumni event. (read the story here)

Robertson at Birthright: is there a double standard for the Christian right, left?

Friday, November 6th, 2009 Earlier this week  Sharon Udasin And Stewart Ain  reported that Birthright-NEXT, the group focused on reinforcing Jewish and pro-Israel identity among young American Jews, invited  Gordon Robertson – son of the controversial Christian broadcasting magnate Pat Robertson – as keynoter for a Birthright Israel alumni event.  (Read their story here)

BREAKING NEWS: Birthright NEXT Hosts Evangelical Leader Who Promotes Messianic Judaism

11/04/2009
Staff Writers

POSTED WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4,  6:00 p.m.

An Evangelical leader who believes Jews can accept Jesus without giving up their Jewish identity will be the keynote speaker in two weeks at an event for Birthright Israel alumni, sponsored by Birthright NEXT and the Jewish Enrichment Center.

Inside ‘Hidden America’

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
In Florida she attended a Sunday morning church service, among more than 5,000 Christian worshippers, which featured rock music and strobe lights. In Texas she went to a Ten Commandments rally at the state house, where Evangelical Christians were urged to put God back into government. Back in Florida, in a soaring cathedral, with a Christian flag flying outside, she heard speakers laud the virtues of creationism. Michelle Goldberg’s year of living Christianly was done for journalistic, not theological purposes.
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