Michele Chabin

Israeli Public Opinion On The Summit: The Height Of Pessimism

10/11/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The bus and highway billboards are, well, explosive.

In the first signs of life from the settler movement since the disengagement from Gaza two years ago, the notices — which signal the Yesha Council of Jewish settlement’s disgust at next month’s planned summit between Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) — insist that “The Agreement between Olmert and ‘Abu Bluff’ Will Explode in Our Faces.”

Homebuyer Heartache In The Holy Land

08/17/2007
Israel Correspondent

Modi’in Illit, the West Bank — For anyone thinking of purchasing an Israeli apartment scheduled to be built in a year or two — many of whom are likely to be Americans, given the foreign investment boom — let the buyer beware.

So says Chaim, a clean-cut 24-year-old fervently Orthodox father of one, with another on the way, who purchased an apartment from the building company Heftsiba in this fervently Orthodox settlement just over the Green Line.

Surf, Sand And Sons (And Daughters)

06/22/2007
Israel Correspondent

For many Israeli families, the word "vacation" is synonymous with "Eilat."

That’s because the town, which is located at Israel’s southernmost tip, on the Gulf of Aqaba, has great weather almost year round and boasts an unbelievable amount of attractions.

Food Bank Planned To Help Solve Crisis

04/12/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — For a single day in mid-March, the parking lot at Hebrew Union College, the Reform movement’s Jerusalem campus, was packed with boxes, not cars, as more than a hundred young volunteers participated in the mitzvah of kamcha depascha, providing food for the needy on Passover.

MKs Out For Blood Over Prof’s ‘Libel’ Book

03/08/2007
Israel Correspondent

JERUSALEM — Ariel Toaff may have backed off his explosive claim in a just-published book that European Jews killed Christians to use their blood — adding credence to the ancient blood libel canard — but this week Knesset members were smelling blood: Toaff’s.

In a dramatic development Monday, two historians who have read the book spoke to legislators at a Knesset Education Committee meeting organized to determine whether Toaff should be charged with a crime.

Suffering From War’s Aftermath

02/19/2007
Israel Correspondent

KIRYAT SHEMONA, ISRAEL — “Mira,” a woman in her late 50s, hasn’t been able to stay home alone since the start of Hezbollah’s summertime war with Israel, when more than 1,000 rockets struck this hilly northern town on the Lebanese border.

Score One For The Anglos

02/08/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Last month, local media outlets reported that HOT, the country’s sole cable television company, had decided to discontinue broadcasting the BBC-Prime channel, a British station featuring favorite BBC programming. The same month, the YES Satellite channel revealed it would be cutting Star World, another of the very few English-language channels broadcast in Israel.

Facing Israel’s ‘Katrina’

11/01/2006
Israel Correspondent

JERUSALEM — When northerners holed up in bomb shelters needed food during the recent war between Israel and Hezbollah, local municipalities contacted non-profit organizations, which in turn delivered the food at their own expense. Numerous other organizations and individuals delivered everything from medications and toys to the northerners, most of whom had fled to the hot, neglected shelters with little more than the clothes on their backs.

A Gut Feeling For Israel

On Birthright’s first culinary trip, an itinerary stuffed with olive presses, shuks and home-cooked Moroccan meals.

02/18/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — It’s one thing to claim Masada as your birthright, or the Western Wall or the Dead Sea.

It’s quite another to be able to say that shakshuka — that iconic and palate-zinging Israeli egg dish — is now part of your cultural heritage.
But that’s exactly what happened this week for 48 participants on Birthright Israel’s first-ever culinary trip.

Birthrighters prepare lunch at an Israeli farm, from vegetables they picked with their own hands. Michele Chabin

Hidden In Plain Sight

07/02/2009
Israel Correspondent Jerusalem

When east and west   Jerusalem were reunited in 1967, Israelis — who had been denied access to the eastern part of the city, including the Western Wall, from 1948 to 1967 — flocked to the Kotel, to the Old City’s decimated Jewish Quarter, and to the colorful stores, restaurants and cultural sites that dotted the eastern half of the city.

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