Michael Miller

Israel Parade Recruits Israelis

05/11/2010

The organizers of the annual Salute to Israel Parade are hoping that there will be an unusual sight at the event next week: lots of Israelis.

Michael Miller, executive vice president of the Jewish Community Relations Council, the parade’s “parent” organization, says a special pitch is being made this year to attract as spectators more of the estimated 200,000 Israelis who live in the New York area to the five-hour, almost-mile-long march along Fifth Avenue.

Vroom at the parade: The annual Salute to Israel march on Fifth Avenue, which includes people on foot and motorcycles.

Clarke Gets An Earful On Israel

Brooklyn rep backtracks on Gaza
after meetings with Jewish leaders.

02/11/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

After voting with 36 other members of the House in November against a resolution that the Goldstone Report to the UN was unfair to Israel, Brooklyn’s Yvette Clarke reportedly told Jewish leaders in her district that she’d consult with them on Middle East issues in the future.

Rep. Yvette Clarke said letters on Gaza she signed “do not provide a complete, and therefore accurate, picture of the situation.

‘War Of The Future’ Is Here II

08/28/1998
Eric Greenberg is a staff writer. Michele Chabin is an Israel correspondent.
Jewish institutions and synagogues in New York City were being warned to boost their security in light of last week’s U.S. attacks on suspected terrorist sites in the Sudan and Afghanistan, while Israeli officials in Jerusalem are viewing the current crisis as part of a continuum of preparedness.

Seminary Heads Unite Against Missionizing

11/12/1999
Staff Writer
In an unprecedented public display of unity, the leaders of America's four major Jewish seminaries signed a letter of protest to the head of the Southern Baptist Convention decrying its new support of "deceptive" tactics to convert Jews.

New Cemetery Rules Proposed

02/12/1999
Staff Writer
Those involved in the business of getting New York's Jews to their final resting place have long been aware of problems in smoothly accomplishing their goal. This week, after several years of negotiations, the Jewish Community Relations Council is poised to sign an agreement with a group of New York City-area Jewish cemetery officials that would help alleviate some of these problems. "I think this is a terrific agreement for everybody. It's good for the cemeteries, the community and the public at large," said Gerald Hass, president of the Jewish Cemetery Association.

‘Dreaming Of What Might Have Been’

11/20/1998
Staff Writer
Several hundred New York City Jewish community leaders and elected officials gathered last Thursday night to commemorate the third anniversary of the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin. The two-hour memorial for the Israeli leader who risked his life for peace was unfolding even as the drums of war rumbled once again in the Middle East as the late Rabin’s good friend, President Bill Clinton, was deciding on military action against Iraq.

‘Agonizing Choice’

09/18/1998
Staff Writer
Suppose you’re on a lifeboat with your two best friends and must toss one overboard. How do you make that agonizing decision? How to look one in the eye and say “Sorry, buddy, but you’re shark food’’?

‘War Of The Future’ Is Here II

08/28/1998
Eric Greenberg is a staff writer. Michele Chabin is an Israel correspondent.
Jewish institutions and synagogues in New York City were being warned to boost their security in light of last week’s U.S. attacks on suspected terrorist sites in the Sudan and Afghanistan, while Israeli officials in Jerusalem are viewing the current crisis as part of a continuum of preparedness.

A Banner Day At City Hall

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
The flag in the background with the sky-blue stripes and Magen David, now torn and battered and stained, once flew in Lower Manhattan. The Israeli flag was among the banners of several nations that hung in the entrance of one of the World Trade Center buildings, representing countries that had commercial interests in the landmark skyscrapers.

The Last Nazi Trial Of The Century

07/31/1998
Staff Writer
It is Poland, the winter of 1941-42. Some four dozen Jews from a labor camp are herded one day to an isolated ravine about 20 miles east-southeast of Lublin, where they are shot to death by SS guards stationed at a nearby training base. After the executions, a high-ranking guard appears at the mass grave. Walking on a wooden plank that spans the bulldozed gully, he notices one man 15 feet beneath him moving, still barely alive, point-ing to his head. The guard aims his rifle at the man and shoots. The man stops moving.
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