Marvin Schick

Bergen County’s Thriving Yeshiva

While many New York-area day schools are in crisis, Yeshivat Noam — blessed with a growing Modern Orthodox community and energetic faculty — is riding high.
05/31/2010 - 20:00
Editorial Intern

When Yeshivat Noam first opened its doors in 2001, it was the kindergarten students — the upperclassmen, so to speak — who ran through the building, checking that every door had a mezuzah.

“We like to refer to them as our pioneers,” said Rabbi Chaim Hagler, principal of the Modern Orthodox school located in Bergen County. “They’ve kind of been eighth graders now for nine years.”

Second graders listen to a unit on bugs and their habitats.

Israel High

New program for 10th-12th graders offers a cost-effective alternative to American yeshiva day schools.
03/31/2010 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

 Surrounded by close friends and enriched by challenging classes, Rebecca Hess feels content at her yeshiva high school in Philadelphia. 

Her parents boast about the high quality of their daughter’s academic education. They couldn’t have asked for anything more in their child’s schooling, they said.

But a recent discovery made them question if they could do better.

 Girls in Bnei Akiva’s Ulpanat Segula in Kiryat Motzkin.

Israel High

New program for 10th-12th graders offers a cost-effective alternative to American yeshiva day schools; tri-state recruitment to begin.
03/28/2010 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Surrounded by close friends and enriched by challenging classes, Rebecca Hess feels content at her yeshiva high school in Philadelphia.

Her parents boast about the high quality of their daughter's academic education. They couldn't have asked for anything more in their child's schooling, the y said.

But a recent discovery made them question if they could do better.

Girls in Bnei Akiva's Ulpanat Segula in Kiryat Motzkin

Orthodox Scandals Could Harm Power Base, Experts Warn

Rash of recent prosecutions may leave community open to political backlash.
02/24/2010 - 19:00
Assistant Managing Editor

In the wake of recent scandals involving local Orthodox Jews, some sociologists think there could soon be a backlash against the political power of what has long been one of the most sought-after voting blocs.

“Situations like this have a cumulative effect,” said William Helmreich, a professor of sociology at City College and director of the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College.

Rabbi Milton Balkany: Brooklyn power broker charged with extortion in hedge fund case.

A Match Made In ... Queens

Novel fundraising approach enables Orthodox day school to thrive.
02/10/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

Alan Steinberg likes to call it the “miracle on Grand Central Parkway.”
Last summer, Yeshiva Har Torah, where Steinberg serves as executive vice president, was, like many other Jewish day schools, scrambling to raise funds to compensate for its widening, $400,000 budget gap.

Lucky for them, a donor approached, offering to match all funds raised in the school’s “Mind the Gap” campaign. But there was a catch: every Har Torah family would have to make some sort of contribution, and within 30 days.

Yeshiva Har Torah’s parents rallied together to donate $200,000 to the school, matched by an anonymous donor.

Fresh Debate Over New National Charter School Movement

Steinhardt-backed group looks to seed 20 new schools, while other charter supporters call vision 'misguided.'
02/02/2010 - 19:00
Associate Editor

The race to establish a national Hebrew charter schools movement has officially begun, igniting a growing, and fierce, debate about the vision and purpose of schools that could potentially revolutionize the American Jewish education landscape.

Principal Maureen Campbell with students at Brooklyn's Hebrew Language Academy Charter School

When The Levee Breaks (Or, When The Levys Go Broke)

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

The din has turned into a roar.

 

People who once quietly murmured about the tuition crisis are now shouting. Many who once casually flirted with the idea of putting their children in public school are filling out the paperwork.

 

In the best economic times it was difficult for Jewish families to find $30,000-$40,000 to educate their kids Jewishly full-time. Now it’s become the Herculean task that some are staring to see as Sisyphean.

 

Notes From A New Public School Parent

Wednesday, January 7th, 2009

After all the years my wife and I have carried  the burden of yeshiva tuition, we never thought we’d see the day we pull one of our children out because of an issue not related to money. But sure enough, because of learning issues that were impeding the progress of one of my kids, we decided an unusual mid-year shift was in order.

 

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