Martin Raffel

Jerusalem, The Mundane City

05/04/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu received a standing ovation at the recent AIPAC conference when he declared, “Jerusalem is not a settlement. It’s our capital.” Pronouncements about Jerusalem as the united, eternal capital of Israel have long served as guaranteed applause lines in virtually every Jewish audience. Israel and world Jewry devote a great deal of attention to the city’s current and future political status.

Fayyad’s Call For Statehood Seen Muddying Peace Efforts

In absence of talks, Palestinian prime minister’s move could trigger violence, experts warn.

04/07/2010
Staff Writer

‘Next year in Jerusalem.”

With that renewed cry from Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad about the creation of a Palestinian state as early as next summer — with east Jerusalem as its capital — several analysts feared this week that Fayyad has built up Palestinian expectations  to a point that could spark violence.

Salam Fayyad: Wants UN recognition for state. getty images

Clinton’s Bluntness At AIPAC Rattles Nerves; Linkage Rapped

Scramble to decipher new diplomatic language; Gen. Petraeus’ comments seen as ‘dangerous.’

03/24/2010

With nerves frayed after the worst U.S. - Israel diplomatic dust-up in years, Jewish leaders this week were trying to assess whether there has been a fundamental change in U.S. policy toward Jerusalem — or simply a change in tone by an ally frustrated by the long years of stalemate.


Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tells AIPAC crowd that status quo in Israeli-Palestinian conflict is untenable. getty images

The Hurdle Ahead

10/16/1998
Staff Writers
Even as they wade through a swamp of unresolved controversies on their interim peace agreement amid distrust exacerbated by a terrorist murder, Benjamin Netanyahu and Yasir Arafat face the threat of that agreement’s broader collapse at their summit near Washington this week.

Controversial Minister Gets Pass From Jewish Leaders

12/01/2006
Editor at Large and Washington Correspondent.
On the eve of his first U.S. visit since becoming deputy prime minister of Israel, Avigdor Lieberman, who calls for stripping Israeli Arabs of their citizenship, has received a provisional pass from much of the Jewish establishment — and a stamp of approval from one leader who denounced him just last May. Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, told The Jewish Week this week, “I don’t see anything extremist since he became part of the government.”

Avigdor Lieberman’s Rise Could Strain Relations With U.S.

02/11/2009
Washington Correspondent

With Avigdor Lieberman poised to play the role of coalition kingmaker after Tuesday’s Israeli electoral tangle, some Jewish groups here are readying a hasbara campaign aimed at convincing Americans that the Yisrael Beiteinu leader is not the racist and political extremist portrayed in the Israeli and international media.

The Bibi-Obama Friction Watch

 More is at stake in D.C. meeting for Netanyahu than for Obama, observers say.

05/13/2009
Washington Correspondent

The smart money (is there such a thing when it comes to American presidents and Israeli prime ministers?) says, No friction.

The atmospherics (the Israeli prime minister won’t utter the words “two-state solution” and his foreign minister wants to ignore prior accords, while the American president wants an end to settlement building) say, Friction galore.

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