Leon Wieseltier

Why Do They Hate Us?

06/29/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

All I hear about these days is the “New Anti-Semitism.” The Anti-Defamation League’s Abe Foxman had a book some years ago — a rather gevaltist book — with the Kahanist title “Never Again? The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism.” Phyllis Chesler had a book on the “New Anti-Semitism.” Even Alexander Cockburn, of all people, weighed in.

Beinart's Cheating Heart (Intermarriage Might Be The Answer)

Let's start off with a song by Hank Williams that pretty much sums up Israel's response to American Jews: "Why can't you be the way you used to be? How come you find so many faults with me? Somebody's changed so let me give you a clue, why don't you love me like you used to do?"

Pro-Israel, With Questions: Beinart Pins his Thesis to the Synagogue Door

05/26/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Peter Beinart attends an Orthodox synagogue, once edited The New Republic (the closest thing to a smicha for Jewish policy wonks) and backed Sen. Joe Lieberman’s quixotic 2004 bid to become the first Jewish president.

Which is why he’s always been counted among the Washington pundits who defend Israel, Zionism and the right of American Jews to lobby for a strong U.S.-Israel relationship.

Beinart also frets about how Jewish his kids will be.

Media: Beinart - Young Jews Want Seats In Jewish Lobby

Peter Beinart warns that alienation from Israel now at a breaking point.

05/25/2010
Associate Editor

Once upon a time, assimilated Jews would, well, assimilate, leaving Judaism to the Jews. Similarly, Jewish liberals — prizing universalism over parochialism — pretty much left Zionism to the professional Zionists.

Peter Beinart’s New York Review of Books essay touched off a serious debate on Zionism.

In Memory Of Ellen Miller, Who Is Still Alive

02/25/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

“[Death...] is not the end of desire. This is the end of memory. An awful prospect, especially for Jews. We don’t mind not being wanted. We mind not being remembered.”
— Leon Wieseltier, Kaddish

The Mourning Son

10/02/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

"For many years I had lived without religion. But I could not have lived without the possibility of religion,” Leon Wieseltier writes in “Kaddish.”

American Jewry’s Decade Of Decadence

While too many Jewish communities historically had to struggle amid the curse of anti-Semitism, American Jewry is flummoxed by its blessings.

12/30/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

It is tragic yet emblematic that Bernie Madoff, the billion-dollar Ponzi schemer, is this last decade’s most influential American Jew. In fairness, if this great economic recession recedes, thanks to Time’s 2009 Person of the Year, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, historians will remember Bernanke more than Madoff. But it is premature to assess Bernanke’s success, while the damage Madoff caused was clear.

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Grappling With Anti-Semitism

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
Columbia University history professor Simon Schama stood at the podium in the Center for Jewish History's auditorium Sunday night relating how the desecration of hundreds of Jewish graves in England last week had affected him personally. "The headstones of my uncle and great-aunt were turned over," when 386 Jewish graves were damaged in East London, he said. Thus began a three-day international conference in New York on the rise of global anti-Semitism.

L'Affaire Judt Rattles ADL; High-Brows Snub Foxman

10/20/2006

Editor At Large
Representatives for a powerful roster of academics and writers this week rejected the Anti-Defamation League's invitation to meet and discuss their charge that the ADL applied pressure to shut down a prominent critic of Israel's New York lecture. Professors Mark Lilla and Richard Sennett, organizers of a protest letter to ADL signed by 113 intellectuals, rejected ADL's denial that it had not, in fact, threatened or pressured the Polish Consulate to deny a platform to New York University historian Tony Judt.

Munich: The Documentary

01/27/2006
Staff Writer
Tony Kushner, one of the screenplay writers for Steven Spielberg's "Munich," explained this week why he portrayed Mossad agents as having regrets and doubts about tracking down and killing the Palestinians who planned the murder of 11 Olympic Israeli athletes in 1972. "I've never killed anyone, but my instincts as a person and a playwright ... suggest that people in general don't kill without feeling torn up about it," he wrote last Sunday in the Los Angeles Times.
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