Lenny Krayzelburg

Maccabi Games In The Swim

08/18/2009
Staff Writer
In 1990, a year out of the former Soviet Union, an unknown swimmer living in Los Angeles, Lenny Krayzelburg took part in the Maccabi Youth Games in Detroit. Today, at 33, Krayzelburg is a retired Olympian, winner of four Olympic medals. Today, he is still a Maccabiah athlete at heart. On Sunday he was a featured speaker at the opening ceremonies, above, held in Madison Square Garden, of the 2009 JCC Maccabi Games.

Maccabi Games In The Swim

08/21/2009
Staff Writer
In 1990, a year out of the former Soviet Union, an unknown swimmer living in Los Angeles, Lenny Krayzelburg took part in the Maccabi Youth Games in Detroit. Today, at 33, Krayzelburg is a retired Olympian, winner of four Olympic medals. Today, he is still a Maccabiah athlete at heart. On Sunday he was a featured speaker at the opening ceremonies, above, held in Madison Square Garden, of the 2009 JCC Maccabi Games.

A Gold Medal In Menschlichkeit

07/26/2002
Staff Writer
He didn't do laps at the Shorefront Y pool that morning : he was resting from an injury. He didn't have his Olympic gold medals with him: they're back home in California. But Lenny Krayzelburg, a swimming hero from the Sydney Olympics, brought his winning smile to Brighton Beach, and the members of the Y's Maccabi swim team were delighted. For 90 minutes he shmoozed with the 60 young athletes, most of them, like him, with roots in the former Soviet Union. He answered questions. He autographed photos. He posed for pictures.

Profiling The Players

08/13/2004
Staff Writer
Many profiles of prominent athletes feature their “p.r.” That stands for personal record, the competitor’s best-ever performance in his or her sport, not for personal religion. So it’s often difficult to determine the religion of an athlete. In this issue and next week’s, The Jewish Week highlights some members of the U.S. Summer Olympics squad competing in Athens who are known to be members of the Jewish community.

Olympic Games 2000: Hopes Up Down Under

09/15/2000
Staff Writer
Who remembers Alfred Hajos-Guttman? He was the Mark Spitz of his day — 1896. At the first modern Olympic Games, in Athens, the Hungarian swimmer won two gold medals, in 100-meter and 1,500-meter freestyle. Jewish athletes won eight more medals at the inaugural Games, starting a sporting tradition that continues until today.
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