Lawrence Schiffman

A Week of Activism

With their own counter events, rallies and even popcorn,
pro-Israel students made sure Israeli Apartheid Week didn’t dominate campus discourse.

03/13/2009
Editorial Intern

Last Wednesday, approximately 70 New York University students viewed “The Impact of Occupation: This Body is a Prison,” as part of Israeli Apartheid Week.
While they watched the film, which is highly critical of Israeli policies in the occupied West Bank, many in the audience noshed on popcorn from cups plastered with pro-Israel messages.

NYU students braved the cold last week to show their support for Israel during a week of Palestinian protests.

First Temple Fireworks

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
He was no King David. But biblical King Joash has suddenly been thrust into the international limelight. Joash, who ruled the Kingdom of Judah for about 40 years (835-793 BCE), is linked to a fascinating debate over the authenticity of a 2,800-year-old stone tablet that bears his name. The black sandstone tablet would be the most spectacular (and virtually only) archaeological find linked to the First Temple: coming at a time when some Arab Muslim leaders claim the two Jerusalem Temples never existed on the Temple Mount.

Manic Christians, Millennial Panic

02/05/1999
Staff Writer
Millions of American Christians believe that Jesus will return to Jerusalem during the millennium, and the Apocalypse will be upon the world. But what if that doesn't happen? Will those disappointed believers react violently against Jews, who play a pivotal role in their cosmic story? One of the nation's leading experts on the millennium warned that Jews around the world, and particularly in Israel, must take action now to prevent a backlash by Christian apocalyptists.

Oh Brother!

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
In Hebrew and Aramaic he was known as Jacob or Yakov. He was a son of a late Second Temple period carpenter named Joseph. And like Robert from the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” he was the forgotten brother of a much more popular sibling. But Jacob, better known to the world as James the Just, was actually no slouch. In Jerusalem, he led a religious congregation of observant Jews devoted to his brother’s memory and teachings until he was also put to death, in the year 63 CE.

Jewish Studies Sans Religion?

11/18/2009
Staff Writer

The latest skirmish in the halls of Jewish academia has, surprisingly, nothing to do with Israel. But the new discord over academic grants made by the Posen Foundation concerns a charged topic just the same — the growing trend of teaching about Jewish culture through an exclusively secular lens.

NYU Jewish studies chair Lawrence Schiffman: Not taking Posen money

Lubavitcher Rebbe Meets The Academy

11/11/2005
Staff Writer
"Reaching for the Infinite: The Lubavitcher Rebbe: Life, Teachings and Impact" was more apt a title for the conference that took place this week at New York University than even its organizers may have realized.

‘Titanic’ Claim About Jesus

03/02/2007
Staff Writer
Holy ground or wholly bunk? Israeli archaeologists excavated a burial tomb’s entrance, above, in the Jerusalem neighborhood of East Talpiot in 1980. Inside they discovered 10 limestone ossuaries, or small burial boxes, including one first-century box, inset. Filmmaker James Cameron, right, says the ossuary is where Jesus is buried. Cameron is producer of “The Lost Tomb of Jesus,” a documentary about the site that premieres next week on the Discovery Channel.
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