Ken Wald

Can Palin Win Over Jews?

Could Obama’s growing problems with the community translate into popularity
for our least-favorite Sarah? Despite a new website, most experts say no.

04/27/2010
Staff Writer

If you believe the conventional wisdom about the 2008 presidential election, Democratic candidate Sen. Barack Obama was having a very tough time garnering Jewish support before Sen. John McCain picked a running mate. Polls in the Jewish community had Obama getting about 55 percent of the Jewish vote, as much as 20 percentage points lower than John Kerry or Al Gore, the two previous Democratic presidential candidates.

Sarah Palin.

More on the AJC poll, Obama's approval ratings, Iran and Jerusalem

On Friday I blogged about the new American Jewish Committee survey of Jewish public opinion - conducted and released earlier than usual because of the rising U.S.-Israel friction and interest in how that would affect political attitudes.

My initial conclusion, which I'm mostly sticking to: Jewish opinion remained pretty stable despite the headlines. Support for President Obama has dropped, but Jews still support him more than the general public.

Tea Party Revolution Could Undermine GOP Jewish Outreach

Minorities of all kinds could be targets of angry,
growing movement, some warn.

02/18/2010
Washington Correspondent

An angry “Tea Party” movement that Republican leaders hope to harness to boost their party’s chances in the 2010 congressional midterm elections could also be a potential blow to GOP outreach to minorities — including Jewish voters.

But Republican leaders, too, are in the movement’s cross hairs, and some Jewish leaders worry that the movement could transcend traditional politics entirely and create an extremist surge that is threatening to all minorities.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin spoke recently at the first Tea Party convention. Getty Images

Good News for McCain — or Polling Mush?

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008 James Besser in Washington Here’s a political shocker for you: Jews who say religion is “an important part of my daily life” are more likely to vote for Sen. John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee, than those who say religion isn’t as important. How do you spell “Duh?” This nugget was part of a Gallup poll released this week that shows the same dynamic working in the broader population, but even more so.
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