Julia Goldman

The Hamische Bohemian

08/23/2002
Staff Writer
When Larry Rivers received the National Foundation for Jewish Culture's Achievement Award in 1991, the painter and jazz musician demonstrated his notorious bad-boy persona.  

Special K

08/16/2002
Staff Writer
Franz Kafka displayed theatrical flair from an early age, composing plays for his three younger sisters to perform. Cabarets and other popular entertainment fascinated him as a young man, and Kafka was especially influenced by the Yiddish theater, an emerging art form in prewar Prague: where he spent most of his short life.   

Feeling The Latin Beat

08/09/2002
Staff Writer
Charly Rodriguez plays Latin jazz. So does Charly Schwartz: which may come as a surprise to his fellow band members in La Onda Va Bien. Schwartz and Rodriguez are the same person: the Brooklyn-born son of Cuban Jewish immigrants who raised him on equal parts Havana rhythms and "Hava Nagila."  

A Bissel Controversy

07/26/2002
Staff Writer
Vera Felice won't do nudity. She won't work on Shabbat. But the 21-year-old actress and model can do accents. A native of Copenhagen, the shapely blonde has no trouble slipping from thick-tongued Russian to saccharine Southern. For her next role, however, the recent graduate of the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute says she won't have to learn a new accent, "just a new language."

A New Context For Yiddish

07/19/2002
Staff Writer
Yiddish is the "mama loshen" to most Jews, the "mother tongue" spoken by generations of parents and grandparents. To David Roskies, Yiddish is also the language of his schooldays: the "lehrer loshen," or teacher language.   

A World-Music Alchemist

07/12/2002
Staff Writer
In print, the Middle East is a political hotspot of clashing ideologies. The music streaming out of the region, however, reveals that a harmonious cross-cultural interchange is also at work there and in countries to the west along the Mediterranean coast.   

Universal Appeal

06/28/2002
Staff Writer
Two uniformed guards recently stopped Michal Rovner as she tried to enter the third-floor galleries at the Whitney Museum of American Art. "We're sorry, ma'am," Rovner said she was told, "the galleries are closed." To get through security, the diminutive Israeli-born artist simply looked up. Taped to the wall (in expectation of an upcoming exhibition) was a sign bearing her name.  

Staples Of N.Y. Jewish Life

06/21/2002
Staff Writer
The Museum of Modern Art's temporary move from Midtown to the former Swingline staple factory in Queens binds the venerable arts institution to New York's immigrant history. Swingline's founder, Jack Linsky, came to America from Russia as a boy and within three decades had revolutionized office work.

Old Kidnapping, New Dispute

06/14/2002
Staff Writer
The fight over Edgardo Mortara is heating up again 144 years after Vatican police abducted the 6-year-old Jewish boy from his family's home in Bologna. At that time, the dispute was about who should raise the child, his parents or the Catholic Church. Today, it's a legal battle over who should tell the story.  
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