Julia Goldman

Sephardic Gangster Flicks

12/06/2002
Staff Writer
The Bettouns are a traditional kind of family. They decorate their homes with menorahs and affix mezuzahs to their doorposts. They gather in the synagogue for bar mitzvah services and celebrate in lavish style. And when someone dies, they immediately say the Shema: even when that person has just been thrown from a helicopter into the backyard of the family compound.   

A Jewcy Chanukah

11/29/2002
Staff Writer
Demographers struggling to calculate the nation's Jewish population may get some help from a group of New Yorkers out to market Jewishness as a hip lifestyle: complete with wardrobe.   

All The 'Rave'

11/15/2002
Staff Writer
Mass gatherings of Israeli youth known as "raves," may bring to mind a besotted Bacchanalia, but a proponent of the popular celebrations says present a spiritual side of Israeli life that can combat the negative images being broadcast from the region.   

A Bat Mitzvah Girl Takes Berlin

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The Jewish world's youngest ambassador to Germany is a frizzy-haired 12-year-old bookworm with a mean crush on Prince William of England. Nelly Sue Edelmeister is the adolescent heroine of a new novel, "Prince William, Maximilian Minsky and Me," by the Brooklyn-born Berliner Holly-Jane Rahlens.

A Bat Mitzvah Girl Takes Berlin

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The Jewish world's youngest ambassador to Germany is a frizzy-haired 12-year-old bookworm with a mean crush on Prince William of England. Nelly Sue Edelmeister is the adolescent heroine of a new novel, "Prince William, Maximilian Minsky and Me," by the Brooklyn-born Berliner Holly-Jane Rahlens.

In The Shadow Of The Shoah

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The Jewish Museum Berlin is not a Holocaust museum. So insists the museum's new project director, Cilly Kugelman, who says, "We define ourselves as a German history museum that focuses on the Jewish minority in Germany." It's a distinction that may be lost on many first-time visitors to the museum's permanent exhibition, which opened to the public one year ago next week.   

The Past Is Present

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Berlin: The memory of World War II crops up in unexpected places here. In idyllic-looking neighborhood parks, at busy intersections and along the streets in lively neighborhoods, one is suddenly confronted with a reminder of the city's bloody past: plaques, small monuments and conceptual art installations recall Berlin's former life as the home of some 173,000 Jewish citizens and their fate under the Third Reich.
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