Jonathan Woocher

This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’
offers game-filled Jewish
education with a soft sell
for 4- to 10-year-olds.

03/05/2010
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.
A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

A Jewish Club Penguin? Created by an Israeli for-profit.

This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’ offers game-filled Jewish education with a soft sell for 4- to 10-year-olds.

03/02/2010
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.

 

A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

 

A Jewish Club Penguin?  JLand is considerably more sophisticated and ambitious than other Jewish computer games.

The Learning Express

08/22/2008
Staff Writer
Houston — In a schoolroom of Congregation Emanu-El, a Reform rabbi is leading a seminar on patrilineal descent. Down the hall, a discussion on Jewish mysticism is taking place under the direction of a Conservative rabbi. A few doors away, an Orthodox rabbi is talking about Ahavat Yisrael, love of one’s fellow Jew. Elsewhere in the synagogue, the largest Reform temple in the Houston area, two dozen other classes and meditation sessions and song-composing workshops are taking place at the same time, led by a cross-section of rabbis and teachers and political leaders.

Day School Alternative Explored In Englewood

02/13/2009
Staff Writer
A group of Jewish parents in Bergen County whose application to establish a Hebrew-language charter school was recently turned down by the New Jersey School Board has started discussions with its local Board of Education for a Hebrew-language track in a public school.

Day School Alternative Explored In Englewood

02/11/2009
Staff Writer
A group of Jewish parents in Bergen County whose application to establish a Hebrew-language charter school was recently turned down by the New Jersey School Board has started discussions with its local Board of Education for a Hebrew-language track in a public school.

The Learning Express

08/20/2008
Staff Writer
Houston — In a schoolroom of Congregation Emanu-El, a Reform rabbi is leading a seminar on patrilineal descent. Down the hall, a discussion on Jewish mysticism is taking place under the direction of a Conservative rabbi. A few doors away, an Orthodox rabbi is talking about Ahavat Yisrael, love of one’s fellow Jew.

Special Trust For Day Schools

07/02/1999
Staff Writer
Observing that more and more grandparents are quietly paying their grandchildren's Jewish day school tuition, UJA-Federation has announced a program under which grandparents can underwrite not only their grandchild's Jewish education but those of other youngsters: at no additional cost. "We really want to make what is happening more formal and to make it financially beneficial for grandparents," said Alisa Rubin Kurshan, executive director of Jewish Educational Planning and Continuity.

Search For The Best And Brightest

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
It has been tried many times before, but the organizers of a new initiative to recruit and retain top Jewish educators insist that this time their efforts will pay off. What's changed, they say, is that a growing number of people are choosing their professions based on how rewarding they are personally rather than monetarily.

Can The Establishment Do Renewal?

03/24/2000
Staff Writer
For the last quarter-century, Jewish Renewal has been a grassroots, anti-establishment movement embraced by Jews searching for spirituality in their lives. Now, itís becoming mainstream. One of the four pillars of the new United Jewish Communities is being called Jewish Renaissance and Renewal. Its 36-member committee is slated to meet in Washington next month to develop ways to make Jewish life more meaningful. Because it is to be the committee's first meeting, it is unclear which areas it plans to address.
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