Joan Rosenbaum

Hot Issues, Cool Art

03/01/2002
Staff Writer

There were plenty of words last Sunday morning on East 92nd Street, but not the sort The Jewish Museum had hoped for when it planned a provocative exhibition of contemporary art meant to rekindle dialogue about Holocaust memory.

About 100 yeshiva students, politicians, Holocaust survivors and other community members, most of them from Brooklyn, directed chants of “Shame on You” and “Don’t go in” toward anyone who approached the museum’s front doors at the 10 a.m. opening of “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art.”

Showdown At Jewish Museum

03/01/2002

In an encounter billed by Dov Hikind as pained outer-borough survivors against uptown intellectuals, a dozen Holocaust survivors and children of survivors were to express their anger in a private meeting Wednesday morning at The Jewish Museum.

Hot Issues, Cool Art

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
There were plenty of words last Sunday morning on East 92nd Street, but not the sort The Jewish Museum had hoped for when it planned a provocative exhibition of contemporary art meant to rekindle dialogue about Holocaust memory. About 100 yeshiva students, politicians, Holocaust survivors and other community members, most of them from Brooklyn, directed chants of “Shame on You” and “Don’t go in” toward anyone who approached the museum’s front doors at the 10 a.m. opening of “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art.”

Showdown At Jewish Museum

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
In an encounter billed by Dov Hikind as pained outer-borough survivors against uptown intellectuals, a dozen Holocaust survivors and children of survivors were to express their anger in a private meeting Wednesday morning at The Jewish Museum.

Vitebsk Returns To Manhattan

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
It’s not in Kansas anymore. Marc Chagall’s “Study for Over Vitebsk,” an 8-by-10-inch oil painting valued at $1 million that was stolen from The Jewish Museum last year, returned for a day to the East Side Jewish institution last week. It had turned up at a post office in Minnesota and was shipped to Topeka, where it was first identified. The painting was later authenticated by Bella Meyer (pictured), granddaughter of the late, Vitebsk-born artist.

Cracking The Glass Ceiling

10/06/2000
Staff Writer
Citing a "glass ceiling" in Jewish communal life that has prevented women from advancing to leadership positions in national Jewish organizations and large city federations, the newly created Trust for Jewish Philanthropy has announced that its first initiative will be to tackle the gender gap. To help the project get off the ground, the philanthropist Barbara Dobkin, who founded and chairs Ma'yan, the Jewish Women's Project of the JCC of the Upper West Side, said she and her husband, Eric, are donating $1 million in seed money.
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