Jew

Israel’s Black Panthers Remembered

BAM film documents Mizrahi civil rights movement of the ‘70s, though inequities still resonate for Jews from Arab countries.

06/29/2010
Staff Writer

Shortly after Israel’s victory in the War of Independence, the Jewish state took in a mass exodus of Jews from Arab lands, first in 1949, and then again in 1956. 

Jews from Arab lands, called Mizrahim, came to Israel not because they were ardent Zionists, but because their host Arab countries, angered by the establishment of the State of Israel, had turned against them. 

A scene from “The Black Panthers (In Israel) Speak” shows a Mizrahi protest from the early ‘70s.

We Were Marching, Too

06/15/2010

I must take exception to your publication’s ongoing characterizations about the composition of the marchers at this year’s Salute to Israel Day Parade: I am a proud Conservative Jew, a member of the board of trustees at Temple Israel of Great Neck, and a board member of SHAI (Sefaradic Heritage Alliance, Inc).

This year I had the privilege of marching with over 170 members of my synagogue, alongside well over 200 members of SHAI (a nondenominational group), alongside approximately 100 members of Gahelet (a secular school for Hebrew speakers).

David Solomon: Making Jewish Wisdom Accessible and Relevant

04/27/2010

David Solomon is a brilliant scholar and highly sought-after lecturer in the Jewish community. His wide range of general knowledge, deep textual scholarship and great sense of humor allow him to be a hugely charismatic educator. We acknowledge David as a Top Jew for his unselfish effort as a one-man teaching machine — in 11 countries over the past few years — with no organized fundraising or institutional support. Watch the videos on Jinsider or visit his teaching site www.inonehour.net.

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Dark Humor

Special to the Jewish Week
03/19/2010

 Earlier this year, New York magazine ran a cover story announcing the death of Jewish humor. “Twilight of the Tummlers” was a profile of Woody Allen and Larry David, tied to the movie “Whatever

Works,” but it was also a prediction that their particular brand of bleak, self-lacerating comedy was not long for this world.

PHOTO: AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE: French refugee children, Portugal, 1941.

One God, Many Tongues

05/01/2009

Last month, while in the Brussels airport on my way back from Israel, I found myself behind an elderly bearded Jew. While waiting for our flights, we began chatting and I asked him — in Yiddish — if he spoke Yiddish. Though we had already spoken in two other languages, Hebrew and English, the transformation that came over him on hearing this third language was amazing. Yiddish created a link between us that the other languages had not been able to do.

Is This Really Necessary? Discrimination at the Kotel

01/08/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

My wife and I returned from our brief trip to Israel this past Sunday morning, and in many significant and less significant ways, we had a wonderful trip.  It was wonderful to be in Israel, to see family, to feel the pulse of Israel in real time… wonderful, as it invariably is.

One God, Many Tongues

The multilingual author believes that Jewish languages help to express Jewishness, and that knowing other languages is essential to understanding the world

05/01/2009
Last month, while in the Brussels airport on my way back from Israel, I found myself behind an elderly bearded Jew. While waiting for our flights, we began chatting and I asked him — in Yiddish — if he spoke Yiddish.

Under One Tent

10/15/1999
Staff Writer
Katrin Yaghoubi wanted to find a synagogue with gemutlichkeit. That’s German for coziness. And it had to have eshtemah. That’s Farsi for community.And a rabbi whose services kept her interest. That’s English for not boring.   It took her almost eight years.An Iranian Jew born in Germany, Yaghoubi now lives in Manhattan but her shul is in Great Neck, home to her mother, one of her three siblings and thousands of other Iranian Jews.  

After 500 Years, A Return To Judaism

Miquel Seguara, a ‘Chueta’ descendant of Mallorcan Jews forced to convert, reclaims his heritage.

12/24/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

More than five centuries after his ancestors were forced to convert to Catholicism, and more than 300 years after a relative was burned at the stake for secretly practicing Judaism, Miquel Segura of Mallorca, Spain, returned to the Jewish people.

‘A Prince Of The Game’

11/20/1998
Staff Writer
Most young boys learning to play basketball at the Jewish Community House in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, in the early 1970s were trying to shoot jump shots like former New York Knick superstar Willis Reed. Or “shake and bake” like Earl (The Pearl) Monroe. Or play defense like Walt “Clyde” Frazier. “Bradley from the corner. Yes!” That was the oft-heard exclamation from a happy 12-year-old who just launched a successful shot from the corner of the gym like his hero, “Dollar” Bill Bradley.
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