Jay Rosenbaum

When In Jewish Rome...

Five Towns teens participate in unique exchange program with Orthodox Jewish Italian peers.

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

‘Curious” was the word 17-year-old Blake Schulman used to describe how she felt as she left her home on Long Island for a week in Italy.
 
“I knew that the Italian kids were Orthodox, but I learned that they were so different than the Orthodox we know in the Five Towns,” she said.
 
After living in Rome with 16-year-old Giorgia Del Monte and her family, Blake said, “It was one of the best experiences of my life.”
 

The Long Island and Roman students pose atop the Renzo Levi Yeshiva, with the Vatican in the background.

An Arena For Forgiveness?

09/19/2008
Staff Writer
A major German company cooperates with the Third Reich during World War II. Years later, it apologizes for its actions and makes reparation payments to Holocaust survivors. The firm is honored in the United States by the Jewish community. Another major German company cooperates with the Third Reich. It also apologizes and makes reparation payments. In an attempt to strengthen its public image in the U.S., it bids to put its name on a prominent football stadium. The firm is heavily criticized here by the Jewish community.

Rabbis Unite Under National Entity

02/26/1999
Staff Writer
Over the strong objections of the nation’s major rabbinic organizations, New York Board of Rabbis President Marc Schneier this week launched a new national rabbinic group that includes 30 members from Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist Judaism. The creation of the North American Boards of Rabbis in Washington, D.C., Monday marks the first time an interdenominational rabbinic group has formed since the Synagogue Council of America disbanded under a cloud in 1995, partly for financial reasons and the growing isolationist philosophy of some Orthodox groups.

An Arena For Forgiveness?

09/17/2008
Staff Writer
A major German company cooperates with the Third Reich during World War II. Years later, it apologizes for its actions and makes reparation payments to Holocaust survivors. The firm is honored in the United States by the Jewish community. Another major German company cooperates with the Third Reich. It also apologizes and makes reparation payments. In an attempt to strengthen its public image in the U.S., it bids to put its name on a prominent football stadium. The firm is heavily criticized here by the Jewish community.
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