Jacob

The Perfectionist’s Dilemma: When is Good Enough Good Enough?

06/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

I wanted my newborn twins’ homecoming to be perfect. But four days after Jacob and Sophie were born, my husband Michael and I were permitted to bring our robust seven-pound son home while our daughter, a dainty four pounds, had to stay in the NICU for a few more days. With one baby in arms and one left behind, our return home was far from perfect. I would quickly learn, however, when perfection would be critical -- and when good enough was good enough.

Deborah Grayson Riegel

No Simple Simcha: The Logistics, Love and Learning of a Blended Family

06/11/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

If you actually pay attention at a Bar or Bat Mitzvah, you just might learn something new. Maybe you'll pick up a meaningful nugget of knowledge from the parsha that you've missed in the past. Perhaps you'll discover how you might get involved in the mitzvah project being discussed on the bima. Or possibly you'll get some insights (and eyesights) as to exactly how much shorter this year's hemlines are than last year's.

Deborah Grayson Riegel

Israel’s ‘Minority In A Minority’

Dor Guez’s video triptych examines the complicated identities of his Arab Christian family members.

06/01/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

If you don’t think that human identity is evanescent, multilayered, poly-vocal and downright confused, you probably won’t get “The Monayer Family,” a triptych of short videos by Dor Guez currently on display at the Jewish Museum.

Guez is a provocative, gifted artist who works in a variety of disciplines and media, focusing his attention on issues of multiculturalism, ethnicity and personal identity; appropriately, his own identity is as contested and complex as it is possible to imagine. The work, unsurprisingly, is the same.

The filmmaker’s grandfather, Jacob, in scenes from “The Monayer Family.”

From Surviving to Thriving: Seeking Job Satisfaction without the Guilt

05/14/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

When we think of the term “survivor’s guilt”, we typically picture those who somehow escaped a tragic car accident that claimed others’ lives, or who lived to rebuild their lives after natural disasters like the recent earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. Over the last two and a half years, however, a new and growing breed of American survivors has emerged, with guilt firmly intact: those who have kept their jobs despite endless rounds of layoffs, closures, and foreclosures. 

Deborah Grayson Riegel

What a Bunch of Flaming Idiots Taught Me About Values

04/29/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

When I received an email from the New Victory Theater announcing a family comedy show called "The Flaming Idiots", my trigger finger clicked to buy four tickets faster than I could stop it. Little did I know that, in between the crackerjack juggling and zany shenanigans, I would experience a dramatic illumination of my personal values.

Life coach Deborah Grayson Riegel

The Gifts Conversation: It's Not (Always) About Money

Battling the 'deficiency perspective.'

04/15/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

"I'm glad I caught you. I wanted to tell you a story about your kids," began the principal of my third-grade twins' Solomon Schechter school. And despite her casual tone, I suddenly stood erect, sucked in my stomach (as if that would help), and readied myself to hear an account that would require "a little chat" at home.

"So, Jacob and Sophie were playing basketball at recess together," she began.

Deborah Grayson Riegel, certified life coach

Reasons To Root: The Mets Stood Up Against Arab Pressure

Here's one big Zionist reason to root for the New York Mets.

Last November 21, the Hebron Fund booked a reception room in the Met's stadium for a fundraising dinner. The fund supports a Jewish presence in Judaism's second holiest city, site of the Machpela (tomb of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca and Leah, and some say Adam and Eve) and King David's one-time capital. The Machpela is to Jews what the Lincoln Memorial is to Americans, except Lincoln isn't buried there but Abraham is.

Clean Sweep

A feminist finds spiritual meaning in what she had seen as drudgery.

Special To The Jewish Week
03/26/2010

When I was a child, I watched my mother turn our New York suburban home upside down during her zealous Pesach cleaning. Later, as a young feminist, I resented the fact that my mother (with the help of our house cleaner) did all the cleaning and cooking before the seders, while my father led the ritual aspect of these meals.
 

I saw my mother as enslaved to an exaggerated notion of the halachic requirement to rid one’s home of chametz, which I thought was totally antithetical to the notion of Pesach as a holiday of freedom.
 

Clean SweepA feminist finds spiritual meaning in what she had seen as drudgery.

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

When I was a child, I watched my mother turn our New York suburban home upside down during her zealous Pesach cleaning. Later, as a young feminist, I resented the fact that my mother (with the help of our house cleaner) did all the cleaning and cooking before the seders, while my father led the ritual aspect of these meals.
 
I saw my mother as enslaved to an exaggerated notion of the halachic requirement to rid one’s home of chametz, which I thought was totally antithetical to the notion of Pesach as a holiday of freedom.
 

Biden’s Visit Capped Weeks Of Provocations

Israel’s ‘insult’ was the least of it.

03/18/2010
Associate Editor

 

 
In a few days, Jews will be concluding their seders with “Next year in Jerusalem.” How provocative. In Arutz Sheva, David Wilder asks, which Jerusalem? East Jerusalem, “occupied,” “disputed,” or “conquered,” as is the media consensus, even though that’s where the Jewish Quarter is?
 

Vice President Joe Biden
Syndicate content