Jack Reimer

Bearing Witness

08/14/1998
Staff Writer
One testified with his words. Samuel Hilton, a Holocaust survivor, sat in the witness chair and described how he lived through the liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto. Others testified with their presence. A dozen recent emigres from the former Soviet Union, also Holocaust survivors, occupied the last two rows of the spectators’ section and listened reverently to Hilton. Most wore Jewish stars, made from yellow paper, on their blouses.

‘I Never Saw A Nazi’

08/07/1998
Staff Writer
Miriam Bram heard about the Holocaust at home all her life. Three of her grandparents are survivors. She learned the facts in high school, and visited the death camps last year in Poland. This week, during her summer vacation, Bram’s Holocaust education continued — on the 15th floor of the U.S. Federal District Court in lower Manhattan. Bram, 18, a sophomore at Stern College for Women, attended the denaturalization trial of Jack Reimer, a Ukrainian-born retiree accused of concealing his activities as an SS guard during World War II.

The Last Nazi Trial Of The Century

07/31/1998
Staff Writer
It is Poland, the winter of 1941-42. Some four dozen Jews from a labor camp are herded one day to an isolated ravine about 20 miles east-southeast of Lublin, where they are shot to death by SS guards stationed at a nearby training base. After the executions, a high-ranking guard appears at the mass grave. Walking on a wooden plank that spans the bulldozed gully, he notices one man 15 feet beneath him moving, still barely alive, point-ing to his head. The guard aims his rifle at the man and shoots. The man stops moving.

Gov’t Pokes Holes In Reimer’s Story

08/21/1998
Staff Writer
He buttoned his sweater, straightened his cuffs, took a gulp of bottled water, glanced around the courtroom and began to explain why, after 46 years in the United States, he should not lose his citizenship. “I didn’t do anything to anybody,” Jack Reimer said.

Gov’t Pokes Holes In Reimer’s Story

08/21/1998
Staff Writer
He buttoned his sweater, straightened his cuffs, took a gulp of bottled water, glanced around the courtroom and began to explain why, after 46 years in the United States, he should not lose his citizenship. “I didn’t do anything to anybody,” Jack Reimer said.
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