Jack Moline

Rabbis And Obama Staff: Give And Take At The White House

05/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Fifteen rabbis go the White House for a meeting. Were the destination not the Roosevelt Room to discuss the nature of American-Israeli relations this could be the opening line of a joke with a punchline I have yet to write. But indeed it was a meeting that was taken very seriously by all who attended. My colleague and friend, Jack Moline of Alexandria, Virginia, arranged the meeting and put together a diverse representative cross-section of rabbis from across the country, from all movements and different kinds of congregations.

White House Meets With Rabbis to Assuage Concerns on Israel

05/14/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- If you tell the rabbis, they will spread the word.

That was the thinking behind two intimate White House meetings -- the second of which took place on Thursday -- with a carefully selected slate of 15 rabbis from across the country and representing the Orthodox, Reform and Conservative streams.

More Reaction to Grossman, Killer of Peggy Park

Rabbis Question Report On Movements’ Harmony

10/09/1998
Staff Writer
Are relations among the leaders of Judaism’s branches as bad as they’ve been portrayed? A recent, well-publicized report on hundreds of examples of rabbinic cooperation nationwide emphasized that the situation may be improving. But even some of the rabbis involved in cooperative efforts questioned the report’s positive spin.

Conservative Jews Hit the Hill

Troubled conservative moment beefs up its Washington presence

05/20/2009
Washington Correspondent

Even as leaders of a troubled Conservative movement try to fend off an incipient rebellion by some synagogues and deal with declining affiliation, they are accelerating their efforts to create an active, visible — but cautious — Washington presence.

Rabbi Jack Moline Names His Own Poison, Takes On Major Washington Role

Monday, May 4th, 2009 For years, Rabbi Jack Moline – leader of a synagogue in suburban Washington  – argued that the Conservative movement needed a stronger, more visible Washington presence, like the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism and the Orthodox Union’s Institute for Public Affairs, both of which are active players in the capital.
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