Israel Parade

Galvanized By Their Love Of Israel

05/11/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Far from letting recent events in Israel dampen his mood or keep him away from this year’s Salute to Israel Parade, Marc Fein, a senior at Yeshiva University, suggested that now was an especially important time to show his love and support for the Jewish state.

Standing in front of the General Motors Building at Fifth Avenue and 59th Street, near the start of the parade route, Fein said that, if anything, he believed that concerns over Israeli security “galvanized support to a certain degree. People have realized the existential threat to Israel.”

The Israel Parade Again

Friday, May 23rd, 2008 The Salute To Israel Parade is back in town this Sunday, and it’s terrific in a multitude of ways, which begs the question: Why does just about every Jewish day school lack confidence in the appeal of this parade, so much so that have to make attendance at the parade “mandatory”? Kids naturally love parades, and most yeshiva kids love Israel, so why is everyone so sure kids won’t come to this parade without a whip and chair?

Teens' Tales Of Terror

05/24/2002
Staff Writer
In Israel's public relations war, one of its best weapons is 16-year-old Gili Karo. Karo, who lives on a moshav in central Israel, was one of seven Israeli high school students in New York this month pressing Israel's case in media interviews, at the United Nations Special Session on Children and in appearances at schools and synagogues. The teens were telling the world what life has been like in Israel over these last 19 months since the start of the Palestinian intifada.

An Exercise In Unity

05/24/2002
Staff Writer
Dr. Ada Berkowitz has demonstrated for Israel, last month in Washington. She has marched for Israel, earlier this month in the Salute to Israel Parade in Manhattan. Next week she will run for Israel, closer to her Queens home. Berkowitz, a pediatrician, will take part in the Run for Israel sponsored by Young Israel of Jamaica Estates on Memorial Day: Monday, May 27, 10:30 a.m. in the Cunningham Park area.

When In New York...

07/20/2007
Staff Writer
Shortly after he moved here in 2001, Rome-born journalist Maurizio Molinari went shopping in a Manhattan supermarket where he found a wide variety of certified-kosher items. “It was not a Jewish store,” he notes. Before Sukkot he noticed lulav-and-etrog sets being sold by vendors along West 72nd Street. No one seemed surprised, he says. “For the non-Jews, it was normal.” One day he went to a Barnes & Noble bookstore. A “huge Judaica section” stood out. Most of the shoppers in the store, as he recalls, weren’t Jewish.

Heights Of Ambivalence

12/24/1999
Staff Writer
It was 22 years ago that Chava Katz and 12 other young Jewish women were permitted by the Syria government to leave their homeland and travel to the United States to find a Jewish husband. Now, with Israel and Syria talking peace, she has mixed emotions. "I hope they do it," she said of the peace negotiations. "But I don't trust any Arab countries. Would I ever go back? Never! Even my husband asks me that. But I would never return because times there were very tough."

War In The Summer of Love

06/22/2007
Associate Editor

There were no classes on the morning of June 5, 1967, the first morning of war, in my yeshiva high school. Instead we prayed like I never prayed in my first 15 years, as if my life depended on it — Israel’s life to be more exact, but that’s how we thought. Our freshman class bulldozed through Tehillim, reading Psalms I never really considered before, thinking Psalms only for old people to say for the dead and the dying, but who knew how many dead or dying there’d be by the end of first period?

UPDATED: Anthony Weiner’s Options

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009 Surprising few, Rep. Anthony Weiner today ended speculation that he may enter the New York mayoral race, declaring in a New York Times Op-Ed that he is focused on making a difference in Washington, while likening a campaign against billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg to facing off a football team of 110 players with only ten teammates at his side.

When The Levee Breaks (Or, When The Levys Go Broke)

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

The din has turned into a roar.

 

People who once quietly murmured about the tuition crisis are now shouting. Many who once casually flirted with the idea of putting their children in public school are filling out the paperwork.

 

In the best economic times it was difficult for Jewish families to find $30,000-$40,000 to educate their kids Jewishly full-time. Now it’s become the Herculean task that some are staring to see as Sisyphean.

 

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