Israel Correspondent

For Israeli Arabs and Jews, Soccer Puts Identity Politics In Play

Cultural tensions and overlaps on view in World Cup rooting interests.

06/29/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — At World Cup time, soccer fever is hailed as a cosmopolitan common denominator.

A café in the central square in Nazareth, is adorned with flags of World Cup favorites. Right, fans watch a match at Tel Aviv.

In Jerusalem, Making Hugs, Not War

06/24/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — It was 102 degrees here earlier this week, but that didn’t deter a few hundred Israelis, Palestinians and others from gathering outside the Old City of Jerusalem for The Jerusalem Hug, an annual event designed to open hearts and heal the world.

Support For Gaza Blockade Seen Sinking in Israel

International pressure causing some Israelis to question sanctions.

06/15/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv—Amid heavy international pressure on the issue, domestic political support for Israel’s economic blockade of the Gaza Strip border passages has badly frayed.

Once confined largely to the Israeli left, criticism of a policy that banned basic goods such as fresh meat, margarine and plaster has spread to security hawks who acknowledge the closure is not serving its original policy goal of weakening Hamas. That may make it easier politically for the government to make concessions on a blockade that, until now, has enjoyed widespread popular support.

Turkey and the Gaza Flotilla: For Israelis, There Goes Another Friend

With loss of Turkey — once a leading vacation destination — life in the Jewish state feels even lonelier.

06/08/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — There was a time, not very long ago, when Israelis had a friend in the Muslim world. As bad as things got with the Palestinians, the Syrians, the Lebanese, Israelis could point to Turkey as a solid bulwark against near total isolation in the Muslim world.

It was a salve to the Israeli psyche.

Israelis are reeling in the aftermath of last week’s flotilla attack.

With New Manifesto, Left Looks To Recharge

‘Peace camp’ grasping for a new vision and way out of political wilderness.

05/21/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — The post-Sabbath demonstration in Jerusalem’s Zion Square this week was a metaphor for the political wilderness that the Israeli “peace camp” finds itself in these days. 

Many held blue and white placards reading “Zionists Aren’t Settlers” and “Stop Settling.” Others held up banners of the dovish group Peace Now.   

With New Manifesto, Left Looks To Recharge

‘Peace camp’ grasping for a new vision and way out of political wilderness.

05/18/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — The post-Sabbath demonstration in Jerusalem’s Zion Square this week was a metaphor for the political wilderness that the Israeli “peace camp” finds itself in these days.

Many held blue and white placards reading “Zionists Aren’t Settlers” and “Stop Settling.” Others held up banners of the dovish group Peace Now.  

About 2,000 dovish Israelis turned out Saturday night in Jerusalem’s Zion Square as the left tries to gain new traction. Getty

Off Message

Israel’s public relations problem can be fixed,
experts say, but not by clinging to the old narratives.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

F irst, the good news. 

Despite frustration among Jews in Israel and North America that the country is losing the public relations battle because of the recent Gaza war and its current hard-line government, recent surveys show remarkably robust support for the Jewish state. 

The Gallup 2010 country-favorability rating ranked Israel fifth, trailing stalwart allies like the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Canada. Israel enjoys a favorability rating of nearly 50 percentage points over the Palestinians. 

Since the war in Gaza and the UN report authored by Richard Goldstone, inset, Israel has been on the PR defensive. Photos by Get

‘We Know The Quiet Won’t Last’

The current Israeli-Palestinian situation seems a tolerable — even a desirable — alternative,
but perhaps only for now.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

 

The main shopping mall in Kfar Saba, a suburb of Tel Aviv, was bombed by a terrorist in 2002 during the most recent Palestinian uprising. It’s been more than seven years, but glass barriers still ring the mall’s perimeter, forcing shoppers to pass through a security check — a reminder of the uncertainty that nags Israelis even though the uprising has long since died out.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Playing It By Ear In Tel Aviv

Sampling the club scene in Israel’s capital of culture.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

 

Tel Aviv — After more than a decade living here,
I’ve long ceased being a tourist in this city. But after nearly five years of fatherhood, I might as well be one as far as Tel Aviv nightlife is concerned.

Bars have opened and bands have matured all just a few steps away from my central Tel Aviv flat. A tiny but fruitful funk scene has sprung up. I hear there’s also an ample selection of indie rock. Meanwhile, I can’t remember the last movie I saw or the last band I saw live in a bar.

Karolina, one of Israel’s most popular young singers, performs at the trendy club Rothschild 12. Joshua Mitnick

The Dead Sea On A Budget

Pampering yourself without breaking the bank.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

E in Gedi — The first time I visited Israel more thaN 30
years ago, I treated my copy of “Israel on $50 A Day” (or whatever the amount was at the time) as if it were a bible. I used it to book cheap hotels, to find cheap restaurants and heeded its advice to flash my student ID card anywhere and everywhere.

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