Isaac

Something Old, Something New

Algerian Jewish wedding traditions inspired a one-of-a-kind dress.

06/16/2010

 I had never envisioned my own wedding until I met my husband Isaac four years ago. We wanted to create a wedding that would reflect both Jewish traditions as well as our own personalities. The summer before our wedding we spent three months in France, studying the colonial archives. At the time I was just beginning my dissertation about Jews during the Algerian War for decolonization (1954–1962).

 Norma DiSciullo

Reasons To Root: The Mets Stood Up Against Arab Pressure

Here's one big Zionist reason to root for the New York Mets.

Last November 21, the Hebron Fund booked a reception room in the Met's stadium for a fundraising dinner. The fund supports a Jewish presence in Judaism's second holiest city, site of the Machpela (tomb of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca and Leah, and some say Adam and Eve) and King David's one-time capital. The Machpela is to Jews what the Lincoln Memorial is to Americans, except Lincoln isn't buried there but Abraham is.

Biden’s Visit Capped Weeks Of Provocations

Israel’s ‘insult’ was the least of it.

03/18/2010
Associate Editor

 

 
In a few days, Jews will be concluding their seders with “Next year in Jerusalem.” How provocative. In Arutz Sheva, David Wilder asks, which Jerusalem? East Jerusalem, “occupied,” “disputed,” or “conquered,” as is the media consensus, even though that’s where the Jewish Quarter is?
 

Vice President Joe Biden

Ancient Tourism

Special To The Jewish Week
03/20/2009

anyone who has visited the holy land knows, Israel is a thoroughly modern country with decidedly unholy traffic snarls, ubiquitous cell phones and all manner of other urban ills.

For some pilgrims, Israel’s highly developed, Westernized culture is a disappointment, as it masks the sights and sounds of biblical times. Jerusalem, for example, may be the holiest city in the world, but it can be hard to envision Temple times with the roar of buses nearby and the smell of pizza in the air.

Scheduling Time For Their Souls

03/26/2008
Staff Writer
A rabbi and a private equity guy walk into a Starbucks in Times Square around 8:30 p.m. on a Monday. The rabbi, sporting a dark beard and a pocket-sized Pirkei Avot (Ethics of the Fathers), orders a grande coffee with soymilk. The private equity investor grabs an iced coffee and a turkey sandwich, and pays for them both.      

Presbyterians Now Trying To Convert Jews

10/17/2003
Staff Writer
A new congregation started last month in the Philadelphia area, just in time for the High Holy Days. The service featured a menorah, a Torah and references to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, not to mention Moses. It also featured references to Jesus and salvation. While there have been no shortage of attempts by Christian groups like Jews for Jesus and Hebrew Christians to sponsor religious events blending two clashing theologies in the attempt to attract unaffiliated and intermarried Jews, this congregation, called Avodat Yisrael (Servant of Israel), is unique.

A Different Kind Of Vision

09/19/2003
Staff Writer
The publisher wanted a suggestion for the cover of a forthcoming book with a religious theme. The publisher turned to the book's author, Rabbi Dennis Shulman. Think of Rodin's "Hand of God," said Rabbi Shulman. iUniverse, the publisher, liked the suggestion.

In The Beginning, Family Feuds

10/14/2009
Editor and Publisher

Before there was a Jewish People, there was a Jewish family, and what a family it was.

It started with Abraham, who had marital strife caused by a jealous wife, parenting problems because his sons didn’t get along and he favored one over the other, and issues with his nephew Lot, who got in with a bad crowd in Sodom and Gomorrah.

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Rabbis Who Dissemble (The Ethics of Lying)

Friday, June 12th, 2009

One of the most disturbing aspects of a controversy we covered this week never made it into the story, due to constraints of deadlines and space.

The report was about a prominent Orthodox rabbi’s alleged statements suggesting that it is permissible to cheat on one’s tax return, presumably because Jews only have to be honest in their halachic dealings, and not necessarily in activities outside of that universe.

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