Gerald Skolnik

WZCs Shenanigans

07/06/2010

In his opinion piece, “We Have Met the Enemy...” (July 2), Rabbi Gerald Skolnik is concerned about the anger he saw on display at the recently concluded World Zionist Congress. As we approach Tisha b’Av, he rightfully fears for sinat chinam — senseless divisive hatred that is traditionally blamed for the destruction of the Temple by the Romans. Yet he claims that the shenanigans at the Congress were in response to “non-Orthodox successes in passing resolutions relating to religious pluralism in Israel.”

We Have Met the Enemy…

06/29/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Since returning from the 36th Zionist Congress in Jerusalem a week ago, I have struggled with a palpable sense of unease about the state of Zionism and the Jewish future. My first impulse was to rather brutally lay that unease at the feet of the World Zionist Organization, which convened the Congress.

In retrospect, I think that impulse was wrong, and unfair.

World Zionist Congress: There Has to be a Better Way

06/18/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

I probably should wait a few days before writing this article. It would, undoubtedly, come out much less hot and bothered if I did. But deadlines being what they are, I am obliged to write it now. I apologize in advance- I think- if it offends certain sensibilities...

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

After the Gaza Flotilla: Zeh Mah Yesh- It is What It Is

06/04/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

In what is probably an epic understatement of major proportions, there is much to say about the events of the past week in Israel. In fairness to my congregants, many of whom read this column but also are waiting to hear what I might have to say on the subject tomorrow morning during Shabbat services, I shall wait until next week to put into written, published words my own take on the flotilla incident.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

Jewish Soldiers Fighting Enemies, And Stereotypes

A meditation on Memorial Day.

05/26/2010
Editor And Publisher

This Monday is Memorial Day.

For most of us that means no work — a holiday that is more about family barbecues and shopping sales than remembering those who gave their lives to protect our freedom. 

That’s especially true for a Jewish community that knows few who serve in today’s all-volunteer military. Can you name even two people in active service? How about one?

Gary Rosenblatt

Whose History is it Anyway?

Some thoughts on the widespread use of the theme of enslavement and redemption as a metaphor for all struggles of national liberation.

04/02/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The Passover Seders that my family has hosted for the past thirty-plus years are radically different from the ones I grew up with. In my parents' home, those attending a Seder were most often family, or occasionally a close friend of my sister's or mine. But in the relatively sheltered world of my youth, having non-Jews at the Seder, as guests, would not have been a serious option.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

A Rabbi's World: The Death of Civility

03/26/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Those of a certain age and inclination will recognize this lyric from a great Buffalo Springfield song of the late '60's: "Something's happening here, what it is ain't exactly clear…" That's exactly what it feels like to me in America right now. Something's happening. I'm not sure exactly what it is, but it feels visceral and scary, and I'm sure I'm not making it up.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

A Rotten Week for Israel

Spitting in Biden's face - and the face of many American Jews

03/12/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

By most of the standards that I- and I dare say many others- would use to evaluate such things, the State of Israel has had an altogether rotten week.  At times, in fact, I found myself wondering whether, in some secret government catacomb, there was a small group of people working on a  strategic game to see how many of Israel's American supporters the Israeli government could alienate in one week.  They've obviously been hard at work…

A Rabbi's World: Purim, 2010

02/26/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

This coming Shabbat will mark our annual observance of Shabbat Zachor, so named because of its command to remember the treachery of ancient Amalek against the Israelites.  Shabbat Zachor is always observed on the Shabbat before Purim, since tradition teaches that the evil Haman was a descendant of Amalek.

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