George W. Bush

Barak Dampens Embassy Furor

The legislative storm over the Clinton administration’s defiance of a law requiring that the U.S. embassy be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is intensifying. But there are also indications that lawmakers, responding to Prime Minister Ehud Barak&

08/25/2009
Washington Correspondent

Several pieces of legislation are in the hopper and letters criticizing the administration’s position are flying down Pennsylvania Avenue, but lawmakers who threatened to strip away the president’s authority to waive penalties under the original Jerusalem Embassy Act have apparently decided to hold their fire.

Meeting with Jewish members of Congress last week, Barak said a decision to force the embassy move now could have implications for the peace process he is trying to revive.

President Obama.gif

Good reading on today’s Obama-Netanyahu-Abbas meeting

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009 There’s been a lot of hype written about the Obama administration’s Middle East plans – everything from the claim the president is planning to impose a full-blown plan on the reluctant Israelis and Palestinians to the idea he’s been totally outfoxed by an Israeli Prime Minister much too sly for him.

Jewish, Israeli guests at White House Ramadan dinner

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009 It wasn’t the first Ramadan dinner at the White House, but it was the first with an Israeli guest. And what a guest: Michael Oren, the spanking new Israeli ambassador.  

Thank You, George W. Bush

Monday, August 31st, 2009 Comments by former Vice President Dick Cheney this weekend suggest his boss, George W. Bush, may have done Israel one huge and unintentional favor. In a Fox News interview, Cheney hinted that he pressed for military action to end Iran’s nuclear program, but was rebuffed by Bush. “I was probably a bigger advocate of military action than any of my colleagues,” Cheney said. Why was that a favor to Israel?

Huckabee: the settlers’ best friend (and maybe the Armageddonists, too)

Monday, August 24th, 2009 Isn’t it nice that former Ark. Gov. Mike Huckabee and his fellow evangelical Christians are “so much more supportive of Israel than the American Jewish community.” That’s what Huckabee, a 2012 Republican presidential frontrunner, told the Christian Broadcasting Network after a trip to Israel that focused mostly on Jewish settlements and East Jerusalem, places most national politicians in this country try to avoid. Well, no, Huck, I think you got it wrong again.

Bush Lowers Mideast Expectations

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
As he visits Israel this week for the second time in four months, President George W. Bush has scaled down his expectations for an Israeli-Palestinian agreement. Instead of the optimism he displayed late last year when he spoke of the creation of a Palestinian state before he left office, Bush told Israeli journalists Monday that he was hoping the two sides could “get a state defined by the end of my presidency.”

Left Seen Awakening Over Netzarim Debate

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
Israelís peace movement, largely dormant since Ariel Sharon was first elected prime minister three years ago, resurfaced last weekend amid calls for a political framework for peace and withdrawal from a contentious settlement in Gaza. An estimated 4,000 Israelis took to the street Saturday night to protest Sharon's policies in a demonstration outside his Jerusalem residence. Naomi Chazan, a former Knesset member from the left-wing Meretz Party and one of the participants, said this was the first major demonstration against Sharon.

Lapid Softens Stance On Haredi Handouts

02/07/2003
Staff Writer
As the Labor Party reaffirmed its intention to stay out of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's new government, the chairman of the secular Shinui Party spoke of joining: and for the first time softened his demand that government handouts end for fervently Orthodox men who don't work. "You have to do it gradually," Shinui leader Tommy Lapid told The Jewish Week. "We don't want to cause unnecessary suffering to large families. But people who are able-bodied men should go and work.

Next For Sharon: Coalition Bind

01/31/2003
Staff Writer
Despite his decisive victory Tuesday, Ariel Sharon still finds himself in a vise: caught between his desire not to form a right-wing government that would hamstring his ability to deal with American peace demands and an Israeli public convinced that the time is not ripe to pursue peace. Couple that with the electorate's crippling blow to the Israeli left and the strong showing of the anti-religious Shinui Party, and this election could pave the way for changes in the country's social fabric.
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