George Robinson

Global Chanukah Groove

11/28/2007

The buzzword in business circles is synergy. That’s what JDub Records was looking for when the not-for-profit label began to think about its third annual Chanukah event. And when Rabbi Daniel Brenner, the vice president for education at the Birthright Israel Foundation, told JDub heads Aaron Bisman and Jacob Harris that he was interested in doing a project with them, the buzz of synergy filled the air.

The ‘Exotic’ Jewish Music

11/28/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

In a way, you might say that by staging his annual Sephardic Music Festival in New York City, Erez Shudnow, better known as dj handler, is paying back an old debt.

The Man With A Hundred Faces

11/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

He has been a rabble-rousing Roman poet and a choreographer struggling with a recalcitrant young ballerina, a doctor battling encroaching age and hospital bureaucracy and a Nazi saboteur hanging from the Statue of Liberty by his fingernails. If you know who he is, you are a serious student of film history. If not, then you may ask – as the title of the new documentary opening on Nov. 23 bluntly puts it — “Who Is Norman Lloyd?”

The Beat Of Faith

11/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Todd Haynes’ films are about shape-shifters, people whose identities are in flux, frequently concealed, even from themselves. You could say that this is the essence of the Jewish experience in the diaspora, and Haynes, whose mother is Jewish, would undoubtedly agree. At any rate, it is the perfect description of the man at the center of Haynes’ new film, “I’m Not There,” which opens on Nov. 21.

The man — or perhaps men — is Bob Dylan.

Spaisman’s Struggle

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

There is nothing in the arts as evanescent as live theater. After the curtain goes down it vanishes, to borrow a metaphor from Dashiell Hammett, “like a fist when you open your hand.” And all you are left with is memories.

Shooting The Resistance

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Aleksander Ford was a Jewish-Polish filmmaker whose career summed up the bloody 20th century. He enjoyed one of the rare happy endings, thanks to a mixture of luck and foresight, but it is clear from his best film, “Border Street” (1949), that he knew all too well how rare his good fortune was. “Border Street,” which will have a rare U.S. showing on Nov. 18, was the first fiction feature to attempt to portray the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, and Ford undoubtedly knew many of the men and women who had perished in the flames that engulfed the ghetto.

Reel Jews

11/08/2007

There have been Jews in Ireland since at least 1079, when the Annals of Innisfallen records the arrival of five, probably merchants from Rouen, on the island. As recently as the late 1940s there were over 5,000 Jews living in Ireland, but that number has dropped steadily since then and the Jewish population is now slightly more than a 1,000. Yet Ireland’s Jews have been, for the most part, a welcome part of their communities, successful in business and, above all, in politics; Jews have served repeatedly as Lord Mayors of Dublin and Cork.

A Mismatched Trio, Strange But True

11/07/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Jack Polak states the situation quite succinctly at the outset of Michele Ohayon’s new documentary, “Steal a Pencil for Me.” The engaging nonagenarian, who is one of the film’s central figures, smiles slyly at the camera and says, “I’m a very special Holocaust survivor. I was in the camps with my wife and my girlfriend and, believe me, it wasn’t easy.”

Israel’s ‘Other’ Cinema

11/01/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Most of us need to be reminded — frequently — that only 80 percent of the population of Israel consists of Jews. The other 20 percent is defined collectively as Arab Citizens of Israel. Most of them are Muslim or Christian, and they come from different ethnic and religious backgrounds such as Druze and Bedouin. Their voices are not heard very often here in the United States, but, as The Other Israel Film Festival powerfully affirms, they bring a lot to the cultural table.

Sing, Sing A (Yiddish) Song

10/18/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Imagine yourself onstage with a hard-rocking, all-star klezmer ensemble. You’re singing Yiddish classics with great voices like Adrienne Cooper, Basya Schechter and Debbie Friedman, and 500 people are cheering.

Sounds exhilarating, nu? Or maybe a little scary?

Would it help if the 500 people were singing along with you?

“Well, a conservative estimate would say that between 60 and 70 percent of the people were singing,” says Zalmen Mlotek.

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