George Pataki

Lazio Tops Ticket As NY GOP Chooses Candidates

06/04/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Eager to win back control of Albany, New York’s Republicans engaged in a spirited battle over the top of their party’s ticket Wednesday at their convention in Manhattan, with supporters of Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy, a Democrat, struggling to get him on the ballot.

Although Levy, who had the backing of GOP state chairman Ed Cox, had enough support to get on the ballot had he been a Republican, 28 percent, he failed to muster enough support in a second roll call to allow him on the ballot before switched parties.

Vallone Braves Hebron

04/24/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — While British Prime Minister Tony Blair practically did cartwheels to avoid courting controversy during his visit to Israel this week, New York City Council Speaker Peter Vallone, also on a whirlwind tour, took no such precautions.

The Art Of Budget Cuts

03/05/2003

In what one arts advocate called the "ritual mating dance" that starts off months of fiscal back-and-forth, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has recommended slashing 6.2 percent from the Department of Cultural Affairs, a decrease that arts advocates calculate will translate into much larger cuts for some institutions and groups. Gov. George Pataki recently proposed slashing 15 percent from the New York State Council on the Arts, while New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey has proposed a temporary freeze on all grants to arts groups.

New Test For Jewish Schools

02/07/2003
Staff Writer
With the city Board of Education undergoing its largest changes in more than 30 years and major state budget cuts anticipated, Rabbi Leib Kelman is hoping the girls at his 1,200-student Prospect Park Yeshiva don't lose out on the special needs services, textbooks, remedial support and other aid funneled to the school through the local district. New York's vast school bureaucracy, which for three-plus decades was administered largely from 32 decentralized districts, is in the midst of a major restructuring, with the mayor and chancellor gaining power.

For Jewish Politics, A Decade Of Declines

Civil liberties, Jewish power, unity on Israel, confidence in elected officials all took hits in a period scarred by 9/11.

12/24/2009
Assistant Managing Editor

At the end of the 1990s, the nation seemed to want nothing more than a scandal-free White House and reassurance that computers wouldn’t go haywire when the clock struck midnight on New Year’s Eve.

But a decade later, the political landscape has been radically transformed, and several important narratives have unfolded that will change Jewish life in America forever.

The Art Of Budget Cuts

03/05/2003
Staff Writer
In what one arts advocate called the "ritual mating dance" that starts off months of fiscal back-and-forth, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has recommended slashing 6.2 percent from the Department of Cultural Affairs, a decrease that arts advocates calculate will translate into much larger cuts for some institutions and groups. Gov. George Pataki recently proposed slashing 15 percent from the New York State Council on the Arts, while New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey has proposed a temporary freeze on all grants to arts groups.

Kiryas Joel Foes Holding Fire

10/22/1999
Staff Writer
Like Jesus' friend Lazarus, Sylvester Stallone's Rocky and the hope that springs eternal, Kiryas Joel, the upstate chasidic school district ruled thrice an affront to the constitution, has yet another legislative lease on life. Last week, the very week its latest appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was turned down Kiryas Joel village took steps to resurrect the school district yet again under a law passed by the state legislature and signed by Gov. George Pataki last August.

Syrit Head Pleads Guilty

10/23/1998
Staff Writer

In a coda to the investigation of Brooklyn Assemblyman Dov Hikind and various associates, Rabbi Elliot Amsel, a key Hikind fund-raiser, pleaded guilty Wednesday to stealing more than $700,000 from Syrit College, the Brooklyn computer school he ran until his indictment.

Juror: Hikind Acquittal Was Easy

07/17/1998
Staff Writer
Once it went to the jury, Dov Hikind’s fate was never in doubt. “We decided pretty quickly he was not guilty” of the bribery charge against him, Lucille Muscarella, a juror in the federal corruption case against the Brooklyn assemblyman, told The Jewish Week. And the jury dispensed quickly, too, she said, with the charge that he had misapplied federal funds.

Hikind’s Fallback Option: Run His Wife?

06/19/1998
Staff Writer
Assemblyman Dov Hikind, on trial for corruption, has told intimates that he is considering running his wife, Shoshana, in his place this fall if he is forced to withdraw from his re-election campaign, Borough Park and Democratic Party sources have told The Jewish Week. But according to one widely respected local leader, if Hikind is convicted on any of the federal felony charges, “The community would be less supportive [of such a move] than he might imagine.”
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