Ernest Michel

Saving Cemeteries Here And Abroad

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
Jack Goldfarb's first memories of Staszow were second-hand. As a child in Philadelphia, the son of immigrants, he heard his parents' stories, in Yiddish, about landsmen in Staszow. He heard about heroic relatives in that market town in south-central Poland who defied the Nazis during World War II and paid with their lives. He heard about the postcards with news of the mishpocha crammed in tiny Yiddish letters that would arrive several times a year, until the war started.

Recalling A Shattered Past

10/30/1998
Staff Writer
For Karl Richter, the most vivid memory of November 1938 is the Jewish hospital in Mannheim, Germany. Rabbi of the city’s synagogue, he walked there with his wife on the morning of Nov. 10, after a night of anti-Jewish riots. The beds were full. “There were lots of people. Some jumped out of windows — with broken arms and legs.”
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